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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

63106 & Me

A St. Louis reporter reflects on his personal connection to the 63106 Project, a reporting series covering one of the most disadvantaged communities in Louisiana.

The 1857 Project: Extracting the Poison of Racism From America’s Soul

In its spring 2020 print issue, GJR explores the history of race in the Land of Dred Scott. Call it the 1857 project because one of the most important chapters in the nation’s story occurred here with the Dred Scott decision reading blacks out of the Constitution and the Lincoln-Douglas debates the next year over whether America could endure part slave and part free. 

Pickled Limes

Filmmaker Kalyanee Mam reflects on how her family has used food to heal and sustain themselves, from their time in Cambodia during the Khmer Rouge regime to their current experiences with COVID-19.

Photo Essay: Behind Veil and Breathing Mask

At the end of May, Iran was hit by a second wave of the coronavirus. Seven photographers have looked around different corners of the country to depict the difficult everyday life of women in Iran during the crisis.

The Chiman Forest in Bolivia

With a sign that reads "Chimán, Mojeño, Yuracaré and Movima Indigenous Territory," the eviction of loggers from the Bolivian Chimán Forest has finally begun.

The Hour of Lynching: Vigilante Violence in India

Returning home after buying two milch cows, dairy farmer Rakbar Khan was lynched by a mob of “cow vigilantes”. His wife seeks meaning in mourning his death, while his perpetrators deny it.

Are We Visible Yet?

In spite of gender and economic disparity, women are often the innovators and change makers that move society forward, working far from the headlines. Choosing to be visible is key to equality.

Afro-Mexican Identity

Veracruz is home to hundreds of thousands of Afro-Mexicans. In 2015, they were officially recognized in the National Census. What's happened since?

Prayers of the Persecuted

Monika Bulaj is producing a visual atlas of threatened minorities and shared holy places.

Iraq: The Journey Home

The story of an Iraqi-Irani woman’s experience of immigration highlights the importance of cultural re-exposure.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

No Journalism Left In Rural India?

More Indians live in rural areas than the entire population of Europe. What does it mean for them if journalism dies a painful death?

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Basketball in Tibet

On the Tibetan plateau, an unlikely group of nomads, Buddhist monks, and yak-wool artisans have seen their lives change—through basketball. Can they also help change Tibet?

Japan's Demographic Reckoning

As Japan experiences its steepest population decline since record-keeping began in 1967, Emiko Jozuka examines how a historically inward-looking country will reimagine its future.

Meet the Journalist: Negar Azimi

As new museums and universities are erected in the Gulf, Negar Azimi reports on the complexities surrounding the use of low-wage migrant labor, with a focus on a group of artist-activists.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Joshua Kucera

Joshua Kucera traveled along the conventional border between Europe and Asia, from Istanbul's Bosphorus to the Russian Arctic—reporting on the people who live between East and West.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

This Week: Witch Hunts Today

This week: Indian women fight back against witch hunts, Bolivia's child labor laws struggle to combat abuse, and the lives of Filipino women whose government killed their loved ones for drug use.

Afghanistan by Choice

This lesson plan outlines reflection and processing exercises connected to Alexandria Bombach's film "Afghanistan by Choice,” which follows five people deciding whether or not to leave Afghanistan.

Recycling as a Cultural Issue

Students are asked to read two articles related to religion's take on pollution and two articles from nations where there is an attempt to make recycling a part of the culture. 

The Power of Poetry

In this lesson, students investigate educational resources using diverse media in order to understand how poetry can be used as a means of communication.