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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

A Matter of Semantics: What Is Disaster?

In order to combat climate change, we need unilateral support from agencies and government offices. We also need voices from local citizens. However, in Peru, disconnection prevails.

Georgia: Day of Dogs

When families flee conflict, they are forced to choose what to bring and what to leave behind. Tomik the dog refused to stay.

 

Taxi in Tbilisi

From actor in St. Petersburg to taxi driver in Tbilisi: one displaced person's search for a place to belong.

Afro-Mexican Identity

Veracruz is home to hundreds of thousands of Afro-Mexicans. In 2015, they were officially recognized in the National Census. What's happened since?

Prayers of the Persecuted

Monika Bulaj is producing a visual atlas of threatened minorities and shared holy places.

Iraq: The Journey Home

The story of an Iraqi-Irani woman’s experience of immigration highlights the importance of cultural re-exposure.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

No Journalism Left In Rural India?

More Indians live in rural areas than the entire population of Europe. What does it mean for them if journalism dies a painful death?

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Basketball in Tibet

On the Tibetan plateau, an unlikely group of nomads, Buddhist monks, and yak-wool artisans have seen their lives change—through basketball. Can they also help change Tibet?

Japan's Demographic Reckoning

As Japan experiences its steepest population decline since record-keeping began in 1967, Emiko Jozuka examines how a historically inward-looking country will reimagine its future.

American Origami

American Origami is a work of images and text that looks at the aftermath of mass shootings in American schools.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Journalist Tom Gardner discusses a two-part series of articles exploring Ethiopia's so-called "development state" and the crisis of expectations driving mass protest and exodus.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Journalist Alice Su speaks about her 2017 project on religion among resettled refugees in Germany, a country that has accepted more asylum seekers than any other European country.

Meet the Journalist: Jackie Spinner

Jackie Spinner spent three months in Morocco exploring the ways in which the country has become a moderate Islamic hub in the North Africa and to examine the contrast between image and reality.

Meet the Journalist: James Whitlow Delano

Post-NAFTA Mexico was flooded with cheap sugary, fatty junk food from the U.S.–triggering a dual crisis: obesity and malnutrition. As NAFTA renegotiations progress, will these crises come up at all?

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

How to Write a Commentary

In this lesson, students listen to a journalist discuss their reporting and then write a commentary. Students were expected to ask questions, take plenty of notes, and come up with a thesis...

Conviction Driven 'Miracles'

After reading Erik Vance's The Science Behind Miracles, students discuss what it means to have a “limitless” world and whether or not science has anything to do with achieving the impossible.

Okur: Thinking Like a Journalist

This lesson introduces students to Paul Salopek's Out of Eden walk and asks students to write a journalistic "milestone" describing their surroundings.

Mind Over Matter

The following lesson plan explores the concept of suggestibility through taste tests and discussion. Students will learn about the role suggestibility plays in various aspects of their lives.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.