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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

Cries in the Night: Life in the Limbo of a Mexican Shelter

A series of Trump Administration immigration rule changes have effectively sealed the border to the vast majority of asylum seekers, leaving tens of thousands of migrants in limbo, and shifting responsibility for U.S. immigration policy to the Mexican government and dozens of Mexican shelters.

Bombs to Coffee

In this coffee shop, former militants learn how to make coffee instead of bombs. They also learn acceptance by serving and interacting with others from diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds.

Georgia: Day of Dogs

When families flee conflict, they are forced to choose what to bring and what to leave behind. Tomik the dog refused to stay.

 

Proxy War in the Horn of Africa

Africa has become the new locus of great power conflict in the 21st century. But this new proxy battle is centered in a tiny nation of just 943,000 people in the Horn of Africa called Djibouti.

Land and Power in South Africa

Calls for expropriation of white-owned land are growing louder in South Africa, setting off a furious reaction from Afrikaner groups, and laying bare a widening rift in the post-Apartheid nation.

In Bosnia, a Risky Occupation

Bosnia has been struggling with a rise in violence against journalists. How does it feel to be investigative reporter in such a divided country?

Negotiating Nuclear Peace

These are trying times for diplomats hoping to make the world safe from nuclear weapons. Heading off a new arms race will require all their skill and, quite possibly, luck.

The Ballymurphy Precedent

In The Ballymurphy Precedent, Collum Macrae probes the killings of 10 unarmed Catholics, including a priest and a mother of eight, in the West Belfast housing estate of Ballymurphy in August, 1971.

In These Hills, Our Gods and Our Futures

In Odisha in eastern India, Arko Datto and Raghu Karnad cover the resistance of Dongria Kondh women to industrial interests that want to exploit their sacred hills for bauxite reserves.

Myanmar's Rohingya: Anatomy of a Genocide

In 2017, Myanmar’s military targeted Rohingya Muslims in a pogrom of mass murder and rape. We investigate the deadliest massacre of a state-orchestrated genocide, years in the making.

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

The Future of Science in Post-War Colombia

After five decades of war, Colombia's government made peace with the FARC rebels. Now scientists are racing to study areas that were once too dangerous to explore.

Justice for the Enemy

The war against ISIS in Iraq is officially over. Now the government faces another momentous task: It must bring those responsible to account.

Meet the Journalist: James Fenton

James Fenton discusses reporting on President Duterte's violent war on drugs in the Philippines. The number of casualties in a 7-month period reached 7,000 following the president's election.

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Taub

Journalist Ben Taub discusses his project, "The Assad Files," the story of how a group of war crimes investigators smuggled 600,000 pages of government documents out of Syria.

Beyond War Conference Highlights

Journalists and youth activists took center stage at the Beyond War Conference, sharing their vision for what it means to maintain journalistic integrity in times of peacebuilding and conflict. 

This Week: Jailing the Mentally Ill

This Week: What happens when people with mental illness go to jail, the Pulitzer Center enters its second year as a media partner for the Catchlight Fellowship, and students are invited to submit poetry about peace and conflict.

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

This week: Why Pakistan and India are equipping their submarines with nuclear-tipped missiles, what life is like for ethnic minority Vietnamese living in Cambodia, and how armed groups have filled a power vacuum in the Central African Republic.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

Facing Risk: Journalists and their Families

This lesson, designed for journalists and journalism students, uses the film "Facing Risk" to guide a conversation about the impact of reporting dangerous stories on journalists and their families.

Exploring Fragile States: Sudan

Sudan has been a "fragile state" for more than two decades. Through this webquest, students are able to explore this complex country using several different reporting projects on Sudan.

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.