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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

The Roots of Ethnic Conflict in Eastern DRC

The 2006 election in the Democratic Republic of Congo was supposed to usher in a new period of peace and stability for the beleaguered, exhausted Congolese people. Instead, it made one of the country's most intractable problems worse. After the election, the small but powerful Tutsi community in Eastern Congo...

Darfur: Broken Promises

After six years of failed peace initiatives and continuing violence, displaced communities of Darfur are ready to fight.

Inside Gaza

Gazan healthcare facilities have been strangled by an Israeli blockade since June 2007, when Hamas wrested control of Gaza from rival Fatah. Since Israel began its massive offensive against Hamas on December 27, 2008, conditions in Gaza's hospitals have faced extreme difficulty in their efforts to care for thousands...

Mexico: Trouble in Culiacán

In the last several years, at least one dozen Mexican norteño musicians have been murdered in a wave of violence bearing the brazenness and brutality of Mexico's drug cartels. Most of the victims performed what are known as "narcocorridos," popular folk songs that tell the stories of the Mexican...

Iraq: The Promise of Freedom

Thousands of Iraqis risked everything to work for the U.S.-led occupation because they believed in democracy. Serving as interpreters, civil society experts and reconstruction contractors, they set out to build a new Iraq.

Today, they are targeted by insurgents as "traitors" and marked for death. Because their...

Unrest in the Uyghur Homeland

Four days before the opening of the Olympic Games in Beijing, the Chinese government faced an unexpected wave of violence in the heart of the country's restive Muslim homeland. On August 4, a small group of Islamic militants staged a daring attack on a police station near Kashgar in...

Sri Lanka: Endless War?

Sri Lanka is a byword for beauty and tragedy. Even the wholesale devastation of the Asian tsunami was not enough to halt a 25-year civil war between an ethnic Sinhalese-dominated government and a notorious separatist group, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, also known as the Tamil Tigers. But...

Cambodia's Curse

For much of the world Cambodia brings to mind the horrors of the Khmer Rouge's killing fields. And because progress is assumed to have taken place in the three decades since, the world tends to overlook the state of affairs there today.

But contemporary Cambodia continues to...

Georgia and Beyond: Russia's Response to Separatism and Ethnic Conflict

The war between Russia and Georgia caught most of the world by surprise but it is a conflict that has long been brewing – and one that is part of a larger drama. The bigger context is Russia's attempt to regain the influence it enjoyed during the years of...

Yemen: In a Fragile State

The poorest nation in the Arab world struggles with high population growth, 40% unemployment and a persistent flow of refugees from Somalia. In the next decade, its 22 million citizens will compete for increasingly scarce water supplies, as aquifers are drilled, pumped and drained unsustainably.

This is...

One Step From Hell

In almost three decades of rule, Robert Mugabe's evolution from liberator to tyrant led Zimbabwe from democratic independence and its status as South Africa's breadbasket to a one-party state with an inflation rate over 231 million percent. Mugabe met early electoral wins by the opposition party Movement for Democratic...

A Journey Home: Afghanistan through the Eyes of a Returning Refugee

Dost Mohammad Fahim Khairy, an Afghan who left his country in a time of great turmoil and was resettled in the United States refugee program, makes his first journey home to Afghanistan since he left on Sept. 15, 2001. A reporting team, comprised of lead reporter Jessica Wanke, reporter...

This Week in Review: Boy Finds Harmony in Juarez

Tom Hundley highlights this week's reporting on a clarinetist in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega's free-market outlook, and Tariq Mir's dispatch about Salafism in Kashmir.

This Week in Review: The Children Left Behind

Pulitzer Center Senior Editor Tom Hundley highlights this week's reporting on the military coup in Mali's capital, Bamako and the feature on the families of China's migrant factory workers.