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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

The Octopus in the Cathedral of Salt

When the trumpet sounded,
everything was prepared on earth,
and Jehovah divided the world
among Coca-Cola Inc., Anaconda,
Ford Motors, and other corporations:
The United Fruit Company Inc.
reserved for itself the juiciest piece,
the central coast of my own land,
the sweet waist of America.
—Pablo Neruda, "The United Fruit Co."

Paraguay: The Brazilians

I asked Lena Rigley, the wife of a Brazilian soy grower, to read from the police report filed shortly after their soy plantation was invaded in 2001:

Paraguay: The Chemicals

Pulitzer center grantee Charles Lane discusses the various chemicals used in soy bean production.

Paraguay: The Squatters

Many Paraguayans' lands have been turned into soy fields and have been forced to become part of the 180 squatters living in the outskirts of Santa Rita.

Ryan's photos featured in Newsweek

Two of Ryan Anson's photos were featured in Newsweek's August 20, 2007 edition. The article titled "How to Beat Terror" looks at the new tactics adopted by Asian states in the war on terror. Authors Joe Cochrane, Criselda Yabes and Marites D. Vitug look at these tactics and the capture of Jemaah Islamiah's leader. Ryan Anson illustrates this article with two of his photos taken in the region. Refer to Newsweek's August 20, 2007 edition for the full story.

Paraguay: An Interesting And Depressing Side Note

An interesting/depressing side note to the last post I forgot to mention. After Lugo left the local press swarmed me to ask why Americans are interested in Lugo. I said he was a compelling character and Americans are interested in a more lefty South America. I was then asked how Americans feel about supporting past regimes who persecuted South American liberals. I said most Americans don't know about it, but those who do are embarrassed. I hope I am correct.

"Why don't you ask him?"

David Enders, for the Pulitzer Center
Iraq

Before leaving the Middle East, there was one last thing I had to do. F., an Iraqi friend and colleague who I worked with in Baghdad and was now living in Damascus needed to get to Jordan. He had been promised a job there. The only problem is that, despite extremely rare exceptions, Jordan has closed its borders to Iraqis.

Paraguay: “I was born Colorado, and I will die Colorado”

Last night I attended my first political rally put on by the Colorado party, the party that has ruled Paraguay since 1947 making it the oldest government in the world. Never before have I seen such blatant puppeteering.

Close to 1000 people squeezed into the tiny courtyard headquarters of the Colorado Sectional in Itapua's Cornell Bogado...

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