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Systems and Safety

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

Girls School in Liberia Reopens After Sex Abuse Scandal

Students at an American charity school in Liberia almost lost their institution to a notorious sex abuse scandal, forcing the academy to close. Then a new, Liberian-run organization formed to re-open the school. In Monrovia, Monique John follows one student on her first day back in class.

Attribution Science and Impossible Heatwaves

Attribution science is connecting weather events directly to climate change. I spoke with the two researchers who found that the 2018 Japan Heatwave was only possible because of climate change.

Before Ferguson, Beyond Ferguson

Families of color have long been thwarted in finding a quality education. We present the saga of one St. Louis family, how they got educated and managed to gain their purchase on the American Dream.

William & Mary Sharp 2018-2019 Reporting Projects

The Pulitzer Center and the College of William & Mary partner again to provide students with deeper global learning and reporting experiences.

The Chinese CRISPR Revolution

China has aggressively embraced CRISPR, a powerful new genome editing tool that's transforming the discovery of improved crops and medicines—and raises thorny ethical, regulatory, and legal issues.

Snakebites and Anti-Venom in the Congo

Doctors without BordersConflict and corruption have crippled the health infrastructure of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Issues beyond the headlines of war and ebola hide amidst the vast swathes of forest and jungle that cover the country.

Death Traps of Havana

Dozens of people have been killed in building collapses in Havana. Time, weather, and neglect are ravaging once-majestic buildings nearly 60 years after Fidel Castro vowed to end "hellish tenements.”

Cancer in Haiti

Getting cancer in Haiti can be like getting a death sentence. Treatments are hard to come by, and with limited options, the poor and powerless pay the price for the reluctance of Haiti’s leaders to invest in their care.

The Waiting List: Organ Transplants in Venezuela

With Venezuela's organ procurement system in paralysis since 2017 and the public health infrastructure in disarray, patients have little or no access to organ transplants, and they face illness and even death.

Meet the Journalist: Katherine Lewin

Old buildings in Havana sometimes collapse without warning, killing or injuring their occupants. Journalist Katherine Lewin discusses the crisis. She traveled to Cuba with journalist Tracey Eaton.

Meet the Journalist: Roxanne Scott

In 1960, about 100,000 turkeys in England suddenly died. Could grain contamination be the cause? Roxanne Scott explores how Nigerian farmers are planning to recover from aflatoxin contamination.

Meet the Journalist: Jon Cohen

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida have each had difficulty mounting a strong response to HIV/AIDS, at a time when neighboring countries or states have made progress in bringing their epidemics to an end.

Meet the Journalist: Nsikan Akpan

The placebo effect influences all types of healing, from acupuncture to laying of hands to the doctor's office. Science producer for PBS NewsHour Nsikan Akpan journeyed from Mexico to Maryland to learn how it works.

IWMF Awards to 2 Pulitzer Center Student Fellow Alums

Student fellow alum Pat Nabong from the Medill School of Journalism was named a Gwen Ifill Fellow by the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF), while Neeta Satam, student fellow alum from the Missouri School of Journalism was awarded an IWMF Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice in the Americas grant.

Resources for World Health Day 2019

April 7 is World Health Day, focusing this year on universal health coverage. If you want to help students understand the health crises facing their communities and the world as a whole, we have resources for you.

How to Write a Commentary

In this lesson, students listen to a journalist discuss their reporting and then write a commentary. Students were expected to ask questions, take plenty of notes, and come up with a thesis...

Conviction Driven 'Miracles'

After reading Erik Vance's The Science Behind Miracles, students discuss what it means to have a “limitless” world and whether or not science has anything to do with achieving the impossible.

Mind Over Matter

The following lesson plan explores the concept of suggestibility through taste tests and discussion. Students will learn about the role suggestibility plays in various aspects of their lives.

Magnetic Minds

This lesson was designed for high school or college science courses. Students will conduct an experiment and discuss the historic and current role of hypnosis in the medical landscape.

Ukraine's Internally Displaced

Students investigate educational resources using diverse media in order to understand how journalists use various mediums to tell different accounts of Ukraine's internally displaced persons.

Human Rights Reporting

Students will critically examine the legal, professional and moral obligations of journalists as witnesses to all kinds of human rights violations.