Tags

Systems and Safety

Where Storms Are Lore, Folks See Change

While hurricanes are woven through the history of Down East Carteret County, a remote string of communities on the central North Carolina coast known for its fishing and boatbuilding traditions, Hurricane Florence was a turning point for conversations on "sea level rise".

Neglected and Unmapped

Efforts to map Makoko, Nigeria assert the presence of the community's residents, streets, and schools after a long history of evictions. 

The Many Varieties of Voter Suppression

America’s decentralized election system fails voters in a common way. As each state adopts independent mesaures, the electoral stresses caused by COVID-19 and laws that aim to ensure the security of American elections may increase voter suppression in the country. 

Sultan: Homeschooling When Home Isn't Safe

Tyra Johnson doesn't allow her kids to play outside, so they've been stuck indoors during the pandemic. Her apartment sits in Preservation Square, in 63106, the ZIP code where people live an average of 18 years fewer than those living eight miles away in Clayton.

Introducing 'Back From the Brink'

After USMC veteran Bill Kirner's father dies, things go from bad to worse. In this trailer for Back From the Brink, Bill's wife worries about having guns in the house, fearing Bill may take his own life.

Lives Frozen by Conflict

Ukraine's war has displaced more than 1.5 million with over 10,000 civilian casualties. In 2014, when the violence broke out, many young people left, while the elderly stayed behind just barely surviving. 

COVID-LA Photo Series

UC Berkeley photography student Clara Mokri captures Los Angeles life in the time of coronavirus through this series of black and white images.

Back From the Brink

Since leaving the service, Dustin Jones, USMC veteran and filmmaker, has lost more friends to suicide than he did in combat. Jones, a Columbia Journalism School Reporting Fellow, follows Marine veteran Bill Kirner as he struggles with PTSD and suicide.

Ukraine's War: Lives Frozen By Conflict

Paula Bronstein's focus is Ukraine's vulnerable, fragile elderly population trapped by an endless war that sees their lives frozen by conflict, impoverished, living in dilapidated homes.

The Frontliners With No Benefits

In the Philippines, frontline health workers are fighting against COVID-19 without protective gear, or health benefits.

Private Prisons: Locking Down the Facts

This series explores the competing political narratives over the efficacy and morality of private prisons and whether they are good for employees, inmates, and the economies of the small towns that often house them.

Battle to the Ballot Box

Voter suppression, harsh voter ID laws, and voter disenfranchisement are on the rise. How does this affect the competitive Democratic primary and United States' most-watched election?

At What Cost?

A Baltimore Sun investigation into Maryland’s child support system and the heavy price it exacts on Baltimore’s poorest families and communities.

The Moving Border

Latino USA, led by veteran journalist Maria Hinojosa, reports on the real-life impact the Trump administration’s latest policies are having on refugees seeking asylum via the U.S. southern border.

Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake

“Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake” takes a look back at what’s transpired in Haiti since the earthquake and explores how far the politically-troubled country has come 10 years later.

Mapping Makoko

Makoko, one of the most crowded slums in Lagos, Nigeria, is finally being mapped—a project intertwined with the fight for property rights in the community.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Nuwer

Tigers, elephants, and other large, charismatic animals are much beloved in the west but, as Pulitzer Center grantee Rachel Nuwer explains, they pose a dire threat to the livelihoods and lives of people who must live with them on a daily basis.

Meet the Journalist: Katherine Lewin

Old buildings in Havana sometimes collapse without warning, killing or injuring their occupants. Journalist Katherine Lewin discusses the crisis. She traveled to Cuba with journalist Tracey Eaton.

Meet the Journalist: Roxanne Scott

In 1960, about 100,000 turkeys in England suddenly died. Could grain contamination be the cause? Roxanne Scott explores how Nigerian farmers are planning to recover from aflatoxin contamination.

Meet the Journalist: Jon Cohen

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida have each had difficulty mounting a strong response to HIV/AIDS, at a time when neighboring countries or states have made progress in bringing their epidemics to an end.

How to Write a Commentary

In this lesson, students listen to a journalist discuss their reporting and then write a commentary. Students were expected to ask questions, take plenty of notes, and come up with a thesis...

Conviction Driven 'Miracles'

After reading Erik Vance's The Science Behind Miracles, students discuss what it means to have a “limitless” world and whether or not science has anything to do with achieving the impossible.

Mind Over Matter

The following lesson plan explores the concept of suggestibility through taste tests and discussion. Students will learn about the role suggestibility plays in various aspects of their lives.

Magnetic Minds

This lesson was designed for high school or college science courses. Students will conduct an experiment and discuss the historic and current role of hypnosis in the medical landscape.

Ukraine's Internally Displaced

Students investigate educational resources using diverse media in order to understand how journalists use various mediums to tell different accounts of Ukraine's internally displaced persons.

Human Rights Reporting

Students will critically examine the legal, professional and moral obligations of journalists as witnesses to all kinds of human rights violations.