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Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund (RJF), launched in September 2018, represents a major investment in international environmental and climate reporting. Through the Pulitzer Center, the RJF will support nearly 200 original reporting projects over five years, along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global tropical rainforest issues like deforestation and climate change–leading to stories that make a difference. The RJF will support and build capacity for local and regional reporters based in the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, and Southeast Asia, as well as international reporters working in those regions. The RJF is supported by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI). For more information about the RJF, please see our announcement and update.

To apply for a Rainforest Journalism Fund reporting grant, please visit the RJF Grants page.

Regional and Local Reporting

Applications for regional projects are independently reviewed by Advisory Committees, composed of experienced journalists, and are expected to propose projects related to tropical rainforests in each region. 

To learn more about RJF's three focus regions and Advisory Committees and view the regional reporting projects supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, please visit the following pages:

International Reporting

For more information about international RJF projects, please visit the International RJF page.

To see the stories and projects supported by the RJF and also by the Rockefeller Foundation, Omidyar Network, MacArthur Foundation, and individual donors, please see the Pulitzer Center’s Rainforests Issue Page.

 

'Death of the Pollinators' Podcast Series (Portuguese)

While the Amazon draws the attention of the world to fires and deforestation, not many people discuss the death of the pollinators, brought on by the widespread planting of soy crops and the excessive use of pesticides.

'Fire Corporation' Investigation Video Series (bahasa Indonesia)

Tempo’s collaboration with Mongabay Indonesia, Betahita, Malaysiakini and Auriga Nusantara found traces of the involvement of a number of forestry and oil palm plantation companies in the big forest fire in 2019.

Smoke Screen (Portuguese)

A detailed analysis reveals the intrinsic relationship between fire and deforestation in the Amazon over the past two years.

Maranhão à Venda | Maranhão for Sale

How Flávio Dino's administration has violated the environmental rights of traditional communities in favor of commodity exploration and extraction with Chinese capital.

All the Flames of the Forest: The Complex Reality of Amazonian Fires Explained

From arson caused by large loggers to the use of fire for subsistence in traditional communities, a journalistic investigation differentiates the types of fires in the Amazon rainforest.

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

From the Amazon Forest to the Industry

Surrounded by the Amazon rainforest, some 400 families from the Middle Juruá Extractive Reserve transform the andiroba and murumuru that they collect from the forest into raw material for industry.

Land, Logs, and Blood

The stateless south of the Brazilian Amazon is the theatre for the explosive combination between unbridled land-grabbing and massive illegal logging.

High Stakes: China in the Amazon

As the world's largest consumer of soy, China's hunger drives Brazil's sales. How the Amazon fits into China's food security policy and Belt and Road Initiative—and what that means for the world.