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Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund (RJF), launched in September 2018, represents a major investment in international environmental and climate reporting. Through the Pulitzer Center, the RJF will support nearly 200 original reporting projects over five years, along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global tropical rainforest issues like deforestation and climate change–leading to stories that make a difference. The RJF will support and build capacity for local and regional reporters based in the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, and Southeast Asia, as well as international reporters working in those regions. The RJF is supported by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI). For more information about the RJF, please see our announcement and update.

To apply for a Rainforest Journalism Fund reporting grant, please visit the RJF Grants page.

Regional and Local Reporting

Applications for regional projects are independently reviewed by Advisory Committees, composed of experienced journalists, and are expected to propose projects related to tropical rainforests in each region. 

To learn more about RJF's three focus regions and Advisory Committees and view the regional reporting projects supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, please visit the following pages:

International Reporting

For more information about international RJF projects, please visit the International RJF page.

To see the stories and projects supported by the RJF and also by the Rockefeller Foundation, Omidyar Network, MacArthur Foundation, and individual donors, please see the Pulitzer Center’s Rainforests Issue Page.

 

The Chiman Forest in Bolivia

With a sign that reads "Chimán, Mojeño, Yuracaré and Movima Indigenous Territory," the eviction of loggers from the Bolivian Chimán Forest has finally begun.

These Trees Are Climate Superheroes

Tropical forests in Indonesia, Brazil, and Democratic Republic of Congo are under-appreciated superheroes regulating and rescuing the global climate. Here is the story of a few of those trees.

Can the Amazon Rainforest Be Saved?

The Amazon rainforest is at a tipping point, with wide swaths of the forest being chopped down. As the planet's most important curb against climate change, saving the forest is of global importance.

The Dams Engulfing Forests

An investigation into the socio-environmental impacts caused by the construction of six hydroelectric dams on the Teles Pires river in Brazil's Mato Grosso state.

Bolsonaro and the Brazilian Amazon

Under the presidency of Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s indigenous communities are bracing for an escalation of repression, encroachment, and displacement throughout the Amazon and the rainforest frontier.

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Escalator to Extinction

On a remote Peruvian mountain scientists showed that birds have moved uphill and the top ones even did extirpate. Is this the beginning of a massive retreat from the tropics because of climate change?