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Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund (RJF), launched in September 2018, represents a major investment in international environmental and climate reporting. Through the Pulitzer Center, the RJF will support nearly 200 original reporting projects over five years, along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global tropical rainforest issues like deforestation and climate change–leading to stories that make a difference. The RJF will support and build capacity for local and regional reporters based in the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, and Southeast Asia, as well as international reporters working in those regions. The RJF is supported by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI). For more information about the RJF, please see our announcement and update.

To apply for a Rainforest Journalism Fund reporting grant, please visit the RJF Grants page.

Regional and Local Reporting

Applications for regional projects are independently reviewed by Advisory Committees, composed of experienced journalists, and are expected to propose projects related to tropical rainforests in each region. 

To learn more about RJF's three focus regions and Advisory Committees and view the regional reporting projects supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, please visit the following pages:

International Reporting

For more information about international RJF projects, please visit the International RJF page.

To see the stories and projects supported by the RJF and also by the Rockefeller Foundation, Omidyar Network, MacArthur Foundation, and individual donors, please see the Pulitzer Center’s Rainforests Issue Page.

 

Massif Expedition

The Colombian Massif region is crucial to the country's survival, providing 70 percent of Colombia's drinking water. Now, the once-pristine landscape faces threats from deforestation, mining, and the illegal crop industry.

In Morona Santiago, Deforestation Exists Alongside Poverty and Cultural Change

Forged documents, cloned trucks, and bribes are some of the methods used by the illegal loggers in Ecuador’s Morona Santiago province to extract timber from the rainforest which the Shuar nation struggle to protect. Government mining concessions to their land have led to evictions and leaders being sued for protesting.

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