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Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund (RJF), launched in September 2018, represents a major investment in international environmental and climate reporting. Through the Pulitzer Center, the RJF will support nearly 200 original reporting projects over five years, along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global tropical rainforest issues like deforestation and climate change–leading to stories that make a difference. The RJF will support and build capacity for local and regional reporters based in the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, and Southeast Asia, as well as international reporters working in those regions. The RJF is supported by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI). For more information about the RJF, please see our announcement and update.

To apply for a Rainforest Journalism Fund reporting grant, please visit the RJF Grants page.

Regional and Local Reporting

Applications for regional projects are independently reviewed by Advisory Committees, composed of experienced journalists, and are expected to propose projects related to tropical rainforests in each region. 

To learn more about RJF's three focus regions and Advisory Committees and view the regional reporting projects supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, please visit the following pages:

International Reporting

For more information about international RJF projects, please visit the International RJF page.

To see the stories and projects supported by the RJF and also by the Rockefeller Foundation, Omidyar Network, MacArthur Foundation, and individual donors, please see the Pulitzer Center’s Rainforests Issue Page.

 

Bamboo-Powered Plants Gone Offline

Power plants in three Indonesian villages stopped operating less than a year after being officially opened. As a result, hundreds of families spend their nights without electricity.

Mercury: Chasing the Quicksilver

Five hundred years after Spanish conquistadors arrived, gold is still a driving economic force in South America's Guiana Shield. But the industry depends on another element, one with deadly side effects for miners and rainforests: mercury.

Double Exposure

For centuries, the Quilombola people, descendants of escaped African slaves, have survived against insurmountable odds in the Amazon rainforest. Now industrial pollution and a pandemic are threatening their existence.

The Toxic Metal in the Shadow of the Gold Industry

Two commodities that are frequently taken over illegally are gold and mercury, and in the Guiana Shield region, one does not go without the other. Mercury has grave impacts on human health and the environment, but efforts so far to curtail its use in the gold industry have only pushed supply chains underground. 

The Dirty Secret Behind the West's Coconut Fad

At a time when the demand for coconut products is exploding in the developed world, the 8 million farmers growing the fruit are far from benefiting — they face a widening gap between the value of their products in the West and what they earn.

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

From the Amazon Forest to the Industry

Surrounded by the Amazon rainforest, some 400 families from the Middle Juruá Extractive Reserve transform the andiroba and murumuru that they collect from the forest into raw material for industry.

Land, Logs, and Blood

The stateless south of the Brazilian Amazon is the theatre for the explosive combination between unbridled land-grabbing and massive illegal logging.

High Stakes: China in the Amazon

As the world's largest consumer of soy, China's hunger drives Brazil's sales. How the Amazon fits into China's food security policy and Belt and Road Initiative—and what that means for the world.

Death of the Pollinators

This year the Brazilian government has authorized the use of 325 pesticides. In Lucas do Rio Verde in the Amazon state of Mato Grosso, the terrible effects of one of these pesticides, Paraquat, was accidentally sprayed over the population back in 2006, can still be seen. It resulted in high cancer rates and the extinction of bees. Will it happen again?

Amazon on Fire

By land and air, a photo essay that shows fire in the heart of the Amazon.

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