Tags

HIV/AIDS

Pastor Sainton During the Riots

In the midst of riots and cholera outbreak, Pastor Joel Sainton continues to minister to Haitians with HIV/AIDS.

Bebe the Mother

A woman relies on sex work to make ends meet, struggling to support herself and her children following Haiti's earthquake.

Ganthier

I thought, he said of the wife
who lasted six months, before
the news of this treachery of the
blood, before he lay on his back
 

Job

This is a home,
this is a shelter,
these walls, shaken,
the lines of jagged
cracks, the split
at the ceiling
that lets in light
and rain

Boy in Blue

The words cluster behind your teeth;
close in, the smooth patina, deep brown,
of your face is alight with the effort:
you, boy, carrying the weight
of an old man

Storm

From here the mountains around
Port-au-Prince are green; too
far to see the denuded hillside,
too far to see the brown wounds

Bebe's Wish

When you leave from here, head down
Canape Vert to your cooling hotel room,
to the breadfruit casserole and barbecue
chicken, to the closed in peace of your
life

Mother of Mothers

The faces of mothers of mothers,
their cheekbones gleaming against
taut skins; their eyes glazed
with the scarring of so much loss.

Tombs

Every crumbled building is a tomb.
We step over grey crushed bricks
and the entanglement of steel.

Earning the Trust of Haitians with HIV

Photographing and telling the stories of HIV positive Haitians after the earthquake requires sensitivity, earning the trust of the subject and allowing their common humanity to show through.

LiveHopeLove.com featured in SubmarineChannel's top 10 web documentaries

"Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica" is featured in a list of the top 10 web documentaries according to SubmarineChannel, a visual culture platform in Amsterdam. SubmarineChannel calls "Hope" a "beautifully-designed reporting project by poet and writer Kwame Dawes sharing testimonies from Jamaican HIV victims, with cross-media contributions pulled together in a dramatically filmic visual style."

Transforming journalism: HOPE & Glass Closet

Award-winning multimedia reporting projects on HIV/AIDS that combine print reporting, poetry, photography, video, radio, music and an open dialogue to engage the broadest possible audience.

Tuesday, September 22
12:00-2:00 pm: Panel discussion and screening
Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism
Third Floor Lecture Hall

Panelists:
Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer
HOPE Special Correspondent/Poet: Kwame Dawes
Glass Closet Filmmaker: Micah Fink
WorldFocus Producer: Lisa Biagiotti

LiveHopeLove.com Wins an Emmy!

Pulitzer Center's multimedia website on the human face of HIV/AIDS in Jamaica has won an Emmy for new approaches to news and documentary programming, in the arts, lifestyle and culture category, announced Sept 21, at the 30th annual News & Documentary Emmy Awards at the Lincoln Center's Rose Theater in New York City.

Yes Weekly: Dawes and Simmonds’ genius elevates Hope Wisteria to unimaginable heights

Near the finale of Wisteria, a multimedia performance based on Kwame Dawes' poems about the memories and experiences of African-American women growing up in the segregated South, Dawes stepped away from the microphone inside Hanes Auditorium on the campus of Salem College. He then gazed upon the five singers, musical collaborator Kevin Simmonds and the seven-member ensemble that helped bring his poems to life with a look that could best be described as a mixture of reverence and pride.

Wisteria & HOPE review in the Winston-Salem Journal

Grand: The piece makes a wonderful whole

Pulitzer Center

Tim Clodfelter, The Winston-Salem Journal

Poet Kwame Dawes provided the words for HOPE & Wisteria, two back-to-back performance pieces that explore different aspects of the black experience. But his contribution, vital as it is, is only one part of the puzzle. Each production is a multimedia piece using music, images and Dawes' poetry.

HOPE: Excerpts from the National Black Theatre Festival

HOPE is a multimedia performance based on poems by Kwame Dawes, poet in residence at the University of South Carolina and set to music by composer Kevin Simmonds. The work grew out of a Pulitzer Center commission to report on the impact of HIV/AIDS on Jamaica, the country where Kwame Dawes grew up. While in Jamaica Dawes wrote poems in response to the stories he heard.