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HIV/AIDS

Haiti, Through a Poet’s Eyes

The State highlights Pulitzer Center's After The Quake project, saying "Their work plumbs depths the mainstream media are unlikely to reach when reporters flock to Haiti this month to mark the anniversary of last year’s earthquake."

Dominican Citizenships Put into Doubt

A change to the Dominican Republic's Constitution, which denies citizenship to children born to undocumented residents, has put into doubt the legal status of people of Haitian descent.

Carrefour

Political turmoil continues following Haiti's election, on the heels of a cholera outbreak and ongoing damage and displacement from January's earthquake.

Fighting Back

A year after Haiti's capital was destroyed by an earthquake, violence and rape haunt the lives of vulnerable women and children living in makeshift settlements. But a handful of Haitians have mobilized to fight for protection and justice for their sisters.

Stories of Rebuilding

GoTriad.com features "Voices of Haiti," a multi-media presentation with poems by Kwame Dawes, photographs by Andre Lambertson, and music by composer Kevin Simmonds and soprano Valetta Brinson.

Poet Kwame Dawes Visits Banneker High School

On Friday, December 17, Kwame Dawes, a poet, professor, and Pulitzer Center grantee, visited Benjamin Banneker Academic High School in Washington D.C.. During the visit, Dawes shared his latest project, "Voices from Haiti," an exploration of Haiti one year after the devastating January 2010 earthquake.

Haiti, After the Quake

When high school seniors from the School Without Walls in Washington, DC were asked what they've heard lately about Haiti by visiting Pulitzer Center journalists, they responded, "not much." Almost 10 months after the earthquake, media attention on Haiti has faded. The country's struggles have not.

From Drought to Flood - Water Images Across the Globe

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is one of the world's greatest public health crisis: 4,500 children die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Conversations with alumnus Kwame Dawes

Annie Paul, The Pelican

Just back from writing poems in India, internationally acclaimed poet and UWI alumnus Kwame Dawes sat down with Annie Paul for an engaging discussion about his life, his alma mater's role in shaping him as an artist and the Emmy Award-winning LiveHopeLove project.

HOPE featured on Nieman Storyboard

Jacqueline Marino

Nieman Storyboard

Writing is part of the digital story: examples of powerful multimedia presentations that incorporate (not just link to) good nonfiction writing.

Current Events: World Water Day

Peter Sawyer, Pulitzer Center

Image from Steve Sapienza and Glenn Baker's Easy Like Water project on floating schools in Bangladesh

From the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels, the water issue affects us all, and we all contribute to it.

"Live Hope Love" Wins Gracie Award for Outstanding Radio Documentary

Produced by Stephanie Guyer-Stevens and Jack Chance of Outer Voices, and Nathalie Applewhite of the Pulitzer Center, the radio documentary, "LiveHopeLove: HIV/AIDS in Jamaica" is part of Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica, the Pulitzer Center's award-winning multimedia reporting project that chronicles poet and writer Kwame Dawes' travels to Jamaica, where he explores the experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS and examines the ways in which the disease shapes their lives.

"House Call in Hell" cited in Baptist Press article

By Baptist Press Staff

A Baptist Press article describing prison conditions in Haiti highlights Pulitzer Center reporting on Haiti's National Penitentiary by Antigone Barton and Steve Sapienza:

The men, by contrast, are imprisoned in Haiti's notorious National Penitentiary, a facility located just a few blocks from the country's National Palace in central Port-au-Prince that was known for squalid conditions before it was largely destroyed by the Jan. 12 quake.