Classroom Subjects

Social Studies

One Year After the Revolution, Where Is Tunisia Heading?

On the one-year anniversary of the Tunisian revolution, a nation struggles with the transition from autocracy to democracy in the face of growing unemployment and religious conservatism.

Murky Waters in Ghana

In Accra, capital of Ghana, residents cope with water scarcity while the state water company rakes in cash from abroad.

United Arab Emirates: Iran's Nuclear Neighbor

U.S. officials believe Iran’s ongoing progress towards a nuclear weapon is pushing Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Egypt and Turkey to follow suit, raising the odds of an Arab nuclear arms race.

Palestinian Youth at a Crossroads

With the economy slowing and the peace process in stagnation, the West Bank's younger generation is at a political crossroad.

Kashmir: The Rise of a Hard Faith

A gentle, mystical form of Islam commonly practiced by millions in Kashmir is now being challenged by a much more puritanical and doctrinaire version imported from Saudi Arabia.

The Promise of Life: Reproductive Choice in Africa

This reporting initiative partners African and US journalists to explore critical challenges in reproductive health and family planning—and what they mean for life, death and socio-economic stability.

Finding Home Again in Ivory Coast

After recent political violence divided communities, some in Ivory Coast look to local water management as a key to reconciliation, social cohesion and long-lasting peace.

India's Anna Hazare: A Gandhian for Today?

Anna Hazare, inspired by Gandhi, transformed a village—Ralegan Siddhi, his hometown. Now, 74 years old, he wants to rid his country of corruption using the same tactics of non-violent resistance.

Art and Politics in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick covers Egypt's political transformation by talking with artists who are beginning to show their creativity after years of forced self-censorship.

Global Perception of Che Guevara

The famous image "Guerrillero Heroico," captured in 1960 by Cuban photographer Alberto Korda, has become an international symbol of revolution. But has it been taken too far out of context?

A Right to Water for Everyone?

This is a multi-week unit on water rights and access. Students examine the causes of water shortages across the globe and explore solutions to ensure that all people have access to clean, safe...

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.

U.S. Responsibility for China’s Workers

This is a multi-week unit on U.S. companies and the welfare of international workers. Students will examine how U.S. companies manufacture their goods and how they care for their workers abroad.

Who Am I?

This multi-week unit for grades 3-5 on the Out of Eden project can be divided for individual lesson plans. Students explore human migration and its impact by generating digital media.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.

Religion and the Environment in China

Students analyze the structure and purpose of "Searching for Sacred Mountain," a 20-minute documentary that explores connections between Buddhism and environmental sustainability practices in China.