Classroom Subjects

Social Studies

The Creative Chaos of Libya

Despairing of the ability of their squabbling leaders and militiamen to reestablish the state, Libyans are busy reviving the country on their own.

Bangladesh: The Real Cost of Fast Fashion

The Rana Plaza tragedy exposed the hidden cost of Bangladesh’s $20 billion-a-year export garment industry. Jason Motlagh returns to investigate the systemic problems that led to the deadly collapse.

Peru: Race in the Rain Forest

In the most biologically diverse place on earth, rising temperatures are causing trees and plants to adapt. Can they do so fast enough?

Syria’s Displaced: Regional Implications

At least 1.5 million people have fled the conflict in Syria. Most have taken refuge in Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, where they are straining resources and raising concerns about regional stability.

Roads Kill

From HIV/AIDS to malaria and tuberculosis, poor countries endure more than their share of health crises. Now they are stalked by a new nemesis on course to claim even more lives—highway fatalities.

Maternal Health in Nicaragua and El Salvador

In Nicaragua and El Salvador, a complete abortion ban has led to unsafe abortions and turned doctors into informants. The number of girls under 14 who give birth has increased by 48 percent.

Scotland: Separation Anxiety?

For more than 300 years, Scotland has been a loyal member of the United Kingdom. But in the fall of 2014, Scots will vote on whether they want to become an independent nation.

The Ngäbe Buglé: Panama’s Vocal Minority

Panama is confronting its electricity crisis by constructing a major dam near a territory designated for the Ngäbe-Buglé, an indigenous people who believe the dam will threaten their way of life.

A Melting Arctic

Global warming is happening faster around the Arctic Ocean than anywhere else. To adjust to this new climate, local communities must change the way they live and work – for better and for worse.

Afghanistan: On Its Own

Foreign troops are leaving Afghanistan. As the decade-long effort to secure the country draws to a close, how are Afghanistan’s most vulnerable communities preparing for the challenges that lie ahead?

Meet the Journalist: Sharron Lovell

Like so many of Mao’s pronouncements, it sounded simple: “The South has a lot of water; the North lacks water. So if it can be done, borrowing a little water and bringing it up might do the trick.”

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.