Reporting

A collection of reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees featuring international news stories published by media outlets from around the world, as well as reporting original to the Pulitzer Center website.

Displaying 7381–7392 of 8278

Mozambique: Paradise Lost, and found?

Tune in this Sunday to CBS “60 Minutes”
Janeen Heath, Pulitzer Center

This Sunday, October 26, the news program “60 Minutes” 60minis airing a story on Gorongosa National Park, reported this summer by CBS journalist Scott Pelley, about American philanthropist Greg Carr’s efforts to bring the destroyed gem back to life. Tune in at 7:00 p.m. EST to CBS, and make sure to also visit the Pulitzer Center’s related reporting to explore this story’s beginning.

If you are unable to watch the show live, you should be able to see it online at the 60 Minutes website after it airs. Or you can find a podcast on their Podcast Page.

This very topic has been the focus of extensive Pulitzer Center reporting. Aerial_view_park_smallBefore the Mozambican civil war, Gorongosa National Park was among the top destinations in Africa, with a higher concentration of animals than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But during the war, soldiers and other poachers killed these vast herds, planted landmines and destroyed the park's infrastructure. By the 1990s, the park was all but abandoned. ...

No News is Bad News

Sitting, waiting, sweating. When you live on the margins in Sudan, there's nothing much behind you, and nothing much in front to look forward to.

And get over any romantic notions about hardy stoic villagers. The people of the Nubian desert tell us they don't like it. And they gather each day in their homes made of mud to share tea and some grinding certainties.

Hijacker

One of the worst places in the world to be a woman is the Democratic Republic of Congo.

DRC: Aging Rebels, Twilight of Amani

Pulitzer Center grantee Michael Kavanagh goes to a town inhabited by the FDLR, the Rwandan Hutu armed group considered a terrorist organization by the US government.

Contamination

My hotel room in Nairobi is a decontamination site right now.

I have come to Africa to cover a virulent new form of the ancient wheat crop scourge called stem rust. It surfaced a few years ago in Kenya and Uganda, spread into Ethiopia, jumped the Red Sea to Yemen, showed up this year in Iran and now threatens the security of the world's second largest crop.

Scientists worldwide are combing wheat varieties for resistance with limited results. Meanwhile, a major worry is that travelers will transport the deadly rust spores outside Kenya which is the hotspot for the disease.

Maasai

Edward Kosen's offer to slaughter a sheep in honor of my visit was a great breakthrough.

All along the road (if you can call that rutted, washboard trail a road) leading to Kosen's farm in western Kenya's highlands, people from Kosen's Maasai tribe had run from my camera. Hapana . . . hapana . . . hapana (no . . . no . . . no) they said in Swahili when I begged for photos.

Violence in Kenya

On top of his losses to wheat stem rust, George Mukindia watched 30 acres of his wheat burn in the flames of Kenya's recent post-election violence.

Mukindia's fields are near Eldoret, where 30 unarmed civilians were slaughtered in a church on New Year's Day.

DRC: Curfew in Goma, NGOs Anxious

Tensions are so high between the government and the CNDP in North Kivu that aid groups are having a terrible time moving across front lines.

DRC: Keeping Score in Goma

This morning Laurent Nkunda's forces took over the Congolese army's biggest base in the east, about 45 minutes from Goma.