Reporting

A collection of reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees featuring international news stories published by media outlets from around the world, as well as reporting original to the Pulitzer Center website.

Displaying 7381–7392 of 8063

Journey to Bahir Dar

William H. Freivogel, director of the School of Journalism at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and a professor at the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute, returned to East Africa this month. The following is the second of his five posts from the field.

BAHIR DAR, Ethiopia - It is Saturday, market day, in this regional capital an hour's plane ride northwest of Addis Ababa. The road from the airport to the university is crowded with farmers walking their goods to market.

Lake Victoria Beset by Environmental Problems

As the morning sky lightens, the sound of machetes hacking through thick grass echoes along the lake's coastline. Fishermen, stripped to their underwear in the already stifling heat, are looking for silvery baby fish along the shoreline in defiance of laws against taking them in breeding grounds.

Notes from Addis Ababa

William H. Freivogel, director of the School of Journalism at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and a professor at the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute, returned to East Africa this month. He traveled through Ethiopia and Uganda with journalism colleagues as part of a State Department grant. They conducted workshops with local journalists, government officials and representatives of aid agencies. Freivogel wrote a diary of his observations during the journey.

Kashmir's Uneasy Peace

After nearly two decades of bitter conflict in Kashmir that fueled tensions between India and Pakistan, separatist violence has decreased — to its lowest level since the armed uprising began.

Still, nearly 700,000 Indian troops are deployed around the state. And there are mounting concerns that if the government does not reduce its presence, frustrations may spark a new cycle of violence.

Credits:

"Kashmir's Uneasy Peace"

Two Into One Won't Go

On a sun-baked plain four hours' drive south of Kathmandu, the capital, a platoon of Maoist fighters in jungle fatigues is on the move. A cry of "lal salaam!" ("red salute!") pierces the air as the drill instructor orders a halt, and the soldiers make thrusts with their mock-up wooden rifles. Even in the haze of dusk, it is clear there are still two armies in Nepal.

Mugabe's "Do or Die" Campaign to Stay in Power

Mrs. Plaxeded Mutariswa Ndira was getting her children ready for school a few weeks ago when she heard a scuffle in the bedroom where her husband was still sleeping.

"Some men ordered him out of bed," she says. "He refused, saying he wanted their IDs. He was grabbed naked and shoved into a vehicle that speeded off. My husband was screaming and wrestling."

Nepal Confronts Delicate Task of Integrating Former Maoist Rebels into National Army

Four years ago, Hardik dropped out of his university-level science studies in the Nepali capital, Katmandu, to join Maoist insurgents in the bush. Admittedly scared sick at first, he said the rigors of guerilla warfare hardened his resolve to oust a ruling monarchy hopelessly out of touch with Nepal's poverty.

Today Hardik is one of more than 23,000 members of the People's Liberation Army idling in U.N.-monitored ceasefire camps, where weapons are locked away and his free time is spent doing English grammar exercises or playing the flute.

Gang's Terror Reign in Guyana Years in Making

GEORGETOWN, Guyana -- In a remote area of southern Guyana earlier this month, security forces tried to surround the country's most-wanted criminal and his gang of well-armed fugitives in their jungle hide-out. But after a fierce firefight, in which authorities say three police officers were wounded and one of the fugitives was killed, the gang escaped deeper into the bush to continue its fight another day.

Radio Reaches Out to DR Congo Rebels

At 0500 on a mountaintop in the forests of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Michel Sibilondire struggles to start his generator.

Nepali Maoists Deny Ongoing Links with Indian Counterparts

KATMANDU, Nepal -- Nepal's Maoist movement has no operational links with the leftist insurgents in India who also call themselves Maoists, the former guerilla army's second-in-command said, dismissing the possibility of any future assistance for their political brethren to the south.

"Political revolution is fixed within a border and we do not export it," Commander Ananta said in an interview with World Politics Review earlier this month at Maoist party headquarters here. "The people of an independent country must decide themselves."