Reporting

A collection of reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees featuring international news stories published by media outlets from around the world, as well as reporting original to the Pulitzer Center website.

Displaying 7117–7128 of 8053

Five Million Dead and Counting

In the North Kivu province of eastern Congo, people are living in ditches along the sides of roads. They're filling up the floors of churches and schools. Displaced people are surrounding the compounds of bewildered U.N. peacekeepers. Young boys and men are hiding in the forest to avoid being killed or forced into armed groups.

Carteret Islands: Every Drop Counts

The first person we met this morning on the Carteret Islands was Nicholas, a 32-year-old fisherman with an easy smile who will lead the youth tour (climate change awareness tour) to Tinputz in the northeast corner of Bougainville. Tall with short spiky hair, Nicholas speaks three languages occasionally spicing up conversation with archaisms like "drunkard fellow."

War's Lasting Legacy

It's been 18 months since Phung Tuu Boi gave me a tour of his Agent Orange remediation projects in Vietnam. Now I get a chance to show him some of my country.

Mr. Boi is in the U.S. this month to speak about his work to scientists, students and journalists. Last night George Lerner and I joined with Mr. Boi and Susan Hammond of the War Legacies Project for an informal discussion of Agent Orange in Vietnam at Columbia University's Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.

University of Minnesota Doctors Battle AIDS in Uganda

Costa Kiggundu had one question for an American visitor to her home in a gritty Kampala slum: "What will happen if you stop sending the drugs?"

It's a life-or-death question for Kiggundu, her son and all of her friends at the clinic where she gets medicine to help her body fight HIV infection, which killed her husband.

Penn Spotlights the HIV/AIDS Situation in Haiti and the DR

Zhicong Wang, For the Pulitzer Center

Every year, thousands upon thousands of students of students declare their intentions to become doctors or health professionals — in an effort, most say, to change the world's current appalling conditions of healthcare and prevailing disparities. However, how much of the world's afflictions and health situations are they really familiar with?

Obama’s tepid Turkish welcome

Iason Athanasiadis, for the Pulitzer Center
Istanbul, Turkey

For president-elect Barack Obama, his arrival on the international scene has been one of near-universal acclaim. Around the world, he is seen as the man who can transform the perception of an ailing America and reclaim that country's ideal of being "the shining city upon a hill". Except in Turkey.

The Crisis: Civil War in Papua New Guinea

Last night I was on edge.

It wasn't just the "ambassador." Much of what I'd read about Bougainville before arriving painted a picture of a troubled and unstable country. Ten years of fighting for autonomy from Papua New Guinea and a brutal civil war ravaged the country in the 80s and 90s.

The "crisis" as the locals call it started in 1989 when villagers in the south protested against Rio Tinto, an international mining company that destroyed a mountainside of pristine rainforest to build one of the largest copper mines in the world.

News from Goma

Recent fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo has forced more than 100,000 people to flee their homes in the last week alone and humanitarian aid groups are overwhelmed. Many who need food and medical assistance can't be reached because of the fighting. As Michael Kavanagh shares in this Reporter's Notebook, the Congolese people have an unfortunate history of being left to their own devices.

Carteret Islands: Five Flights and Three Days Later

The Carteret Islands are some of the most remote islands in the South Pacific. Three days after leaving New York City and five flights later, we arrived in Buka at the tip of Bougainville, where we plan to catch a boat to the Carterets to document how climate change is impacting this low-lying atoll.

Native without a Nation

Firasstudents

Firas Majeed is one of the more than one million Iraqi refugees living in Syria. He left his family's home in Baghdad in 2005 to escape the violence that continues to plague Iraq. He made the decision to leave Iraqi for an uncertain future in Jordan after the militia that controlled the neighborhood he was living in demanded he join them.