Projects

Reporting projects from Pulitzer Center grantees

Displaying 1129–1140 of 1148

Understanding Iran

On the surface, Iran is simply a theocracy in a standoff with the United States. But access to the everyday lives of Iranians gives a window into the country's complex web of culture, religion and politics. Despite decades of repressive leadership, Iran arguably has the longest-lived democratic movement in...

South Sudan: Rebuilding Hope

Gabriel Deng, Koor Garang and Garang Mayuol, Southern Sudanese "Lost Boys" in the U.S., were forced to flee Sudan as children when their villages were attacked in 1987, finding safety for a time in a refugee camp in Ethiopia until needing to flee once more, this time to Kakuma...

Peru's Petroleum Play: Amazon Oil and Politics

Oil and gas finds are turning the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains and the adjacent Amazonian lowlands of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia into a hydrocarbon hotspot.

Vietnam: War's Lasting Legacy

More than three decades after the Vietnam War ended, the Vietnamese people continue to live with the consequences of Agent Orange, a defoliant that has come to symbolize the unintended consequences of warfare.

During the war, American forces sprayed nearly two million gallons of Agent Orange across...

Philippines: Mindanao's Frustrated Peace

Photojournalist Ryan Anson returns to Mindanao, southern Philippines to examine the pitfalls and successes of the peace process with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). His photographs also document how violent clan-based politics as well as the government's ongoing counterinsurgency campaign against the al-Qaeda linked Abu Sayyaf Group affect...

Ethiopia: Tainted Ally

U.S.-backed Ethiopian troops grabbed headlines in late 2006, invading Somalia to drive the Islamic Courts Union from power. Less known is the Addis government's massive persecution of its own people.

It is true that Ethiopia is at war — with itself. For more than a century Ethiopian...

Kyrgyzstan on the Brink

Home to the sole U.S. forward operating base into Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan maintains strong ties to Russia. With a compromised press, a bankrupted economy and intense religious tensions, the country is in danger of rolling back its few democratic advances.

Edil Baisalov, an activist who led Kyrgyzstan's 2005...

Mozambique: Paradise Lost, and Found?

Before the Mozambican civil war, Gorongosa National Park was among the top destinations in Africa, with a higher concentration of animals than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But during the war, soldiers and other poachers killed these vast herds, planted landmines and destroyed the park's infrastructure. By the 1990s,...

Rwanda: Teens Reaching Across a Divide

Several Vermont high school students traveled to Rwanda in December 2006 to meet with teenagers orphaned by AIDS. The six students and adults from two schools filmed, photographed and interviewed Rwandan teenagers participating in a program aimed at helping them become financially independent.

The program, based in the Rwandan...

Venezuela's Hugo Chavez: Despot, or Democrat?

Andrew Cutraro and Guy Taylor uncloak the cult of personality surrounding the Bolivarian movement of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, and a policy of aggressive and orchestrated media relations.

Caucasus in Context

Pulitzer Center Director Jon Sawyer traveled to Russia and throughout the South Caucasus, reporting on a region marred by it's conflicted history and caught between East and West, North and South.

Cambodia: Of Vice and Men

French attorney Jacques Vergès has devoted a long career to defending terrorists, dictators and mass murderers. He has consistently challenged the wider social order judging his defendants. Critics call him a devil's advocate, and a scandalously immoral publicity seeker.

Stéphanie Giry found a more complex reality as...