Issue

Religion

Religious faith is central to the lives of billions, a driving force in everything from family structure to relationships within and among the world’s nation states. It is also the venue, and often the source, of conflict.

Religion presents Pulitzer Center reporting on these themes from throughout the world—from the explosive growth of megachurches in Africa and Latin America to intra-Islam schisms of the Middle East, to the self-immolation of Tibetan Buddhist monks and Buddhist soldiers running roughshod over the rights of Burmese Muslims, to the struggles of faith groups everywhere to come to terms with human sexuality.

In some parts of the world, notably China, governments that long suppressed religious expression are now invoking those traditions as part of the solution to environmental and other challenges. Elsewhere, from majority-Catholic Philippines to Muslim Indonesia, religious doctrine on issues like reproductive rights is in uneasy dialogue with the forces of modernization and globalization.

In Religion, we aim for reporting that tackles these tough, core issues—but without the easy stereotypes and caricature that too often make journalism a tool for demagogy. In the Pulitzer Center reporting presented here we seek instead to be a force for understanding.

The Pulitzer Center’s reporting on religion and public policy issues is made possible through the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, the Kendeda Fund, and other Pulitzer Center donors.

 

Religion

Domestic Abuse in Russia

PBS NewsHour goes inside Russia to report on the effects of domestic violence under President Vladimir Putin.

Migrant Life in Qatar

In Qatar and other Gulf countries, mostly low skilled migrant women pay the price for the crime of zina, which criminalizes unmarried sex and pregnancy out of wedlock.

A Burma Primer

Next week, President Obama will become the first U.S. president to visit Burma. Learn about what's going on in Burma and the issues that Obama may discuss with President Thein Sein.

Pax Ethnica Reviewed by Washington Post

Former Ambassador-at-Large David Scheffer praises the book "Pax Ethnica: Where and How Diversity Succeeds," by Pulitzer Center grantees Karl Meyer and Shareen Brysac.

Jason Motlagh Wins National Magazine Award for Digital Media

The Virginia Quarterly Review was awarded the National Magazine Award for Digital Media in the News Reporting category for Jason Motlagh's, "Sixty Hours of Terror" a four-part series covering the November 2008 Mumbai attacks.

The National Magazine Awards (known as the "Ellies") are presented by the American Society of Magazine Editors and the Journalism School at Columbia University. This is their first year to honor achievements in digital media.

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