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Voices from Copenhagen Part 2

Pulitzer Center Student Fellow Sara Peach interviewed youth leaders and activists from around the world attending the COP15 conference for her reporting project "Youth Change the Climate in Copenhagen."

In these segments, Peach captures perspectives on climate change from youth around the world.

Indian Youth Activist Ruchi Jain Addresses Leaders in Copenhagen

Ruchi Jain, 23, was working as a marketer in Mumbai, India, when she left her job to become a full-time climate activist with the Indian Youth Climate Network and 350.org. At the United Nations climate change conference, she participated in Youth and Future Generations Day, Dec.10, 2009, a day of discussions about the impact of climate change on young people's lives. She spoke passionately before a crowd of youth and U.N. official Yvo de Boer.

Interviews in Copenhagen

In the last 18 months I have traveled through five continents reporting about research on, and impacts of, climate change. In Europe I reported on the heatwave of 2003, which scientists say was made more likely by Earth's rising temperatures. I interviewed researchers who predict more and warmer extreme heat events in the coming decades. In India and Bangladesh I reported on the impacts and possible responses to rising sea levels caused by melting glaciers and warming sea water.

Voices from Copenhagen

Pulitzer Center Student Fellow Sara Peach interviewed youth from around the world attending the COP15 conference for her reporting project "Youth Change the Climate in Copenhagen." In these videos, youth from around the world discuss the impact climate change plays on their lives.

On day 37 of her hunger strike, Australian activist Anna Keenen discusses climate justice, direct action, and the need for reflection to achieve unification.

Ethnicity still divides Bosnia

More than a dozen years have passed since Bosnia and Herzegovina's bloody civil war ended. Although the country has repaired physically, its citizens are experiencing political and social challenges. Special correspondent Kira Kay examines political instability in Bosnia 14 years after the end of a brutal civil war that resulted in the deaths of 100,000 people.

Greek farce: 'Mother' play satirizes corruption

A corrupt Greek minister tries to sell the Parthenon to the country's powerful Orthodox Church to develop into a casino. An enterprising young reporter reveals the ploy to widespread popular outrage, prompting the minister into a campaign of bribery to try to suppress the story.

A Conversation with Indian Youth Activist Ruchi Jain

Ruchi Jain, 23, was working as a marketer in Mumbai, India, when she left her job to become a full-time climate activist. Today she works with the Indian Youth Climate Network and 350.org, and she traveled to Copenhagen in December to participate in the climate talks.

Student Fellow Sara Peach followed Jain during the two-week conference as she rallied other youth activists and testified before UNFCCC Executive Secretary Yvo de Boer and found out why she gave up her marketing career and why – like many youth around the world – she now has her eyes on the United States Senate.

Conversations from Copenhagen

For two weeks Copenhagen was the world capital of climate science and policy. Journalist Dan Grossman spoke with many climate science and policy experts. The blog posts that follow about his conversations—containing text, photos and videos—tell part of the story of who was there and what they said. Read excerpts below.

Danish Wind Energy

On a tour of the Middelgrunden offshore wind farm off the coast of Copenhagen, Anja Pedersen, an adviser to the Danish Wind Industry Association, describes the scale, benefits and public attitude toward wind energy in Denmark. Denmark produces more than one-fifth of all its electricity with about 5,000 windmills. The country produces by far the largest share of its electrical power with wind of any country in the world, enough wind power to supply every Danish house at the period of peak demand on a windy day.

A Geologist's Obsession with the Past

The Rockefeller complex of Copenhagen's Neils Bohr Institute—a golden-hued brick building—would fit well in a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. Geology professor Dorthe Dahl-Jensen works there in a small office by a gable, under the building's steeply sloped tile roof. Here in Copenhagen she's dressed fashionably, in matching black skirt, blouse and jacket. She has a pageboy haircut and wears a string of pearls and a tiny, round COP15 lapel pin. I last saw Dahl-Jensen in July 2003, on the Greenland Ice Sheet.