Region

Asia

Beyond Myitsone

While national attention in Myanmar remains focused on the Myitsone dam, six other mega-dams north of the Ayeyarwady River could be constructed if conflict between the Tatmadaw and KIO is resolved.

To Feed Its 1.4 Billion, China Bets Big on Genome Editing of Crops

China’s agricultural scientists are investing heavily in CRISPR, a revolutionary genetic editing tool, in hopes of improving the country’s food supply. In the first in a series of Pulitzer Center-supported stories for Science Magazine, Jon Cohen reports on the Chinese scientists on the vanguard of a revolution in food supply.

Government Work

India's Ministry of Happiness promised to improve the lives of its citizens. But did it work, or was it merely a marketing campaign gone awry?

Laughing at ISIS

If you are scared of terrorists, they relish that. If you express hatred towards them, they feed off of that. But if you laugh at them, they don't know how to react.

Inside Russia

PBS NewsHour goes inside Russia for a series that explores everything from the bilateral relationship with the United States to ascendant nationalism, widespread propaganda, and the fate of the President Vladimir Putin’s enemies.

The Lasting Legacy of the Bhopal Gas Leak

More than 30 years after the world's worst industrial accident, the people of Bhopal are still dealing with its long-term and health and environmental fallout. Whose responsibility is it to help them?

A Woman's Crime and Punishment

When unmarried sex is outlawed, pregnancy out of wedlock is proof of a crime. Women are jailed—along with their babies.

China Pushes Back Against Air Pollution

China is seen as a poster child for smog, but it is pushing back against air pollution with a wind and solar power rollout that also has big ramifications for the fight against climate change.

Exploring Myanmar's Conflicted Future

As Myanmar emerges from half a century of isolation to join the globalized world, Doug Bock Clark and Corey Pattison will report on the forces struggling to shape the country's future.

India: Migrating Into Slavery

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

Climate Change in the Maldives

As conversations about climate change gather steam in the Maldives, many question whether the government is taking serious concerns that businesses can no longer protect visitors from rising seas.

China's Frayed Perimeter

Why, despite growing vastly richer and steadily more powerful over the last generation, has China remained frustrated in its goal of bringing Hong Kong and Taiwan under its unquestioned authority?

Meet the Journalist: Karim Chrobog

Pulitzer grantee Karim Chrobog reports on South Korea's innovative food recycling program–and compares it to the US, where 30 to 40 percent of what is grown and raised in the United States is wasted.

This Week: Cambodia's Murdered Journalists

Cambodian journalists facing violent retribution, the work of a Chinese activist and documentary filmmaker, and what deployment to Iraq meant for New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina.

School Lunch Around the World

In this lesson, students will explore controversy about India's midday meal program and consider how school lunches around the world compare to their own experiences. 

Museum of Current Crises

This lesson plan outlines a project that allows students the opportunity to connect with a contemporary crisis somewhere in the world.

Improving Students’ Blogging Skills

After a series of chats with Pulitzer Center journalists, students reflect on the experience in a creative yet relevant form of writing by producing a blog post.

Weighing the Pros and Cons of Working Abroad

Students will read articles and watch videos as preparation to an empathy-building exercise that will help them understand why people choose to leave their families to seek out employment overseas.