Region

Asia

Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

Impact of U.S.-China Trade War Felt in Both Countries

For decades, the world's two largest economies — the U.S. and China — have been integrated. But the Trump administration is now trying to undo that, as an escalating trade war impacts consumers and businesses in both countries.

China’s Massive Belt and Road Initiative Builds Global Infrastructure — and Influence

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most expensive infrastructure project in history. Chinese companies are constructing roads, pipelines and railroads across the globe. But they are also building China’s influence, and critics in the U.S. and Asia worry Belt and Road projects can reduce countries’ sovereignty and grow Chinese power. With the help of the Pulitzer Center, Nick Schifrin reports.

Cambodia: Trauma, Justice, Governance

Cambodia's post-genocide journey creates new opportunities and risks in national systems such as health, justice, and tech governance. It also reveals remarkable stories of human courage over time.

The 2011 Japan Tsunami

From the personal to international, examining the long-term cultural impact of the 2011 Japan tsunami.

Myanmar's Rohingya: Anatomy of a Genocide

In 2017, Myanmar’s military targeted Rohingya Muslims in a pogrom of mass murder and rape. We investigate the deadliest massacre of a state-orchestrated genocide, years in the making.

Breathtaking: Gasping for Air Across the Globe

Airborne particles—sometimes much smaller than the width of a human hair—are not just contributing to climate change. They are a leading driver of serious illness the world over.

A Safe Place to Learn and Grow

Who are the Rohingya? Why have they fled Myanmar? "A Safe Place to Learn and Grow" takes young readers to Bangladesh to learn what is being done to help refugee children heal and access education.

Losing Earth

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Meet the Journalist: Joshua Kucera

Joshua Kucera traveled along the conventional border between Europe and Asia, from Istanbul's Bosphorus to the Russian Arctic—reporting on the people who live between East and West.

Meet the Journalist: Xyza Bacani

Xyza Bacani discusses her story on migrant workers who run away from their employers in Singapore and the power imbalance between agencies, employers and migrants that encourages exploitation.

Meet the Journalist: Wudan Yan

Palm oil has been condemned for rampant deforestation in Southeast Asia. How can the world produce more of it in a more sustainable manner? Journalist Wudan Yan investigated in Fall 2016.

Meet the Journalist: James Fenton

James Fenton discusses reporting on President Duterte's violent war on drugs in the Philippines. The number of casualties in a 7-month period reached 7,000 following the president's election.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

This week: Why Pakistan and India are equipping their submarines with nuclear-tipped missiles, what life is like for ethnic minority Vietnamese living in Cambodia, and how armed groups have filled a power vacuum in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

This Week: Witch Hunts Today

This week: Indian women fight back against witch hunts, Bolivia's child labor laws struggle to combat abuse, and the lives of Filipino women whose government killed their loved ones for drug use.

This Week: Seeking Answers for Iran’s Chemical Weapons Survivors

This week: Scientists investigate the long term effects of chemical warfare on Iranian soldiers, a look into how artistic integrity is maintained inside the Chinese Communist system, and more than 100 people are suing Guam's Catholic Church over accusations of sexual abuse by priests.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

Psychological Effects on Migrant Workers

This lesson covers some of the psychological impacts that affect migrant workers and their families using reporting on Filipino migrant workers and their families by Ana P. Santos.

To End AIDS: Addressing Community Needs

Students develop solutions for challenges in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Students will conduct in-depth research on their issues, create proposals, and present them.

Exploring Downstream: Water Resources

Through this webquest, students use several different projects on the "Downstream" web portal to examine the impact of water resources on a wide range of communities around the world.

A Right to Water for Everyone?

This is a multi-week unit on water rights and access. Students examine the causes of water shortages across the globe and explore solutions to ensure that all people have access to clean, safe...

U.S. Responsibility for China’s Workers

This is a multi-week unit on U.S. companies and the welfare of international workers. Students will examine how U.S. companies manufacture their goods and how they care for their workers abroad.