Region

Asia

The Lost Genocide

The Rohingya have been stripped of citizenship, prevented from having children, and systematically murdered. But the United Nations may never be able to prosecute the Rohingya genocide.

Capital Offenses

Under President Rodrigo Duterte, thousands have died at the hands of police or the masked vigilantes who roam Manila's vast slums.

Cambodia's Curse

For much of the world Cambodia brings to mind the horrors of the Khmer Rouge's killing fields. And because progress is assumed to have taken place in the three decades since, the world tends to overlook the state of affairs there today.

But contemporary Cambodia continues to...

Vietnam: The Price of Rice

The doubling of the price of rice in Asia has given rise to what some have coined "the Asian Food Crisis." While some economists feel that this is a temporary price hike, others see that the devastation from the recent cyclone in the central rice growing region of Burma...

A Journey Home: Afghanistan through the Eyes of a Returning Refugee

Dost Mohammad Fahim Khairy, an Afghan who left his country in a time of great turmoil and was resettled in the United States refugee program, makes his first journey home to Afghanistan since he left on Sept. 15, 2001. A reporting team, comprised of lead reporter Jessica Wanke, reporter...

Afghanistan: Failure of Expectation

The Taliban is not the only threat facing Afghanistan. The rise in poppy cultivation places the country at risk of moving from narco-economy to narco-state, and as eradication efforts continue to prove wildly unsuccessful, the threat increases. Yet the reasons for poppy's growing influence in the country are not...

Nepal: The Road to Peace

In April 2008 Nepal turned a corner. More than 60 percent of eligible voters turned out for elections to choose a new government tasked with abolishing the monarchy and forging a stable republic after a decade-long insurgency that claimed over 13,000 lives. Despite pre-election violence and intimidation, international observers...

Terror in the Golden Land

Repressed and mismanaged by a cadre of generals since 1962, Burma erupted last September in the country's largest pro-democracy demonstrations in two decades. But when government troops opened fire into crowds of monks and students and detained thousands in nighttime raids, fear sent people into hiding and swept defiance...

American Imports, Chinese Deaths

Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside America's factory, China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying.

In interviews with dozens of dying workers and through review of their medical records, she documents how Chinese workers routinely lose limbs from old machinery or develop fatal diseases...

Fort Bragg East: Rebuilding Afghanistan

Across Afghanistan suicide attacks are on the rise and in much of the country U.S.-allied forces confront a revived Taliban. A surprising exception is the eastern province of Khost, a hotbed of insurgent activity and al-Qaida ties since before 9-11 but today an unlikely oasis of hope in a...

India: Conflicts Within

Today Maoist insurgents keen to exploit the state's enduring weaknesses stalk the Hindu heartland. They are waging their "people's war" in under-policed areas where conditions are most fertile.

Understanding Iran

On the surface, Iran is simply a theocracy in a standoff with the United States. But access to the everyday lives of Iranians gives a window into the country's complex web of culture, religion and politics. Despite decades of repressive leadership, Iran arguably has the longest-lived democratic movement in...

Vietnam: War's Lasting Legacy

More than three decades after the Vietnam War ended, the Vietnamese people continue to live with the consequences of Agent Orange, a defoliant that has come to symbolize the unintended consequences of warfare.

During the war, American forces sprayed nearly two million gallons of Agent Orange across...

Philippines: Mindanao's Frustrated Peace

Photojournalist Ryan Anson returns to Mindanao, southern Philippines to examine the pitfalls and successes of the peace process with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). His photographs also document how violent clan-based politics as well as the government's ongoing counterinsurgency campaign against the al-Qaeda linked Abu Sayyaf Group affect...

This Week in Review: Boy Finds Harmony in Juarez

Tom Hundley highlights this week's reporting on a clarinetist in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega's free-market outlook, and Tariq Mir's dispatch about Salafism in Kashmir.

This Week in Review: The Children Left Behind

Pulitzer Center Senior Editor Tom Hundley highlights this week's reporting on the military coup in Mali's capital, Bamako and the feature on the families of China's migrant factory workers.

This Week in Review: After the Oil Is Gone

Pulitzer Center Senior Editor Tom Hundley highlights this week's reporting on United Arab Emirates' renewable energy investment, Afghanistan, the LRA and our new iPad book project on South Sudan.