Region

Africa

Sucked Dry

Huge swaths of land acquired by foreign investors in Africa's Nile River Basin export profits and displace communities.

Conservation Capture

Dividends of South Africa’s biggest land claim settlement are benefiting less than a third of intended recipients. What does this mean for ecotourism on community land bordering the Kruger National Park?

Trapped in the Buffer Zone

Climate finance was designed to bring money and development to the local communities that host such major tree-growing projects, but, in Bukaleba Forest Reserve, Uganda, four communities that have lived on the land for generations are struggling to survive.

Far from Over

Tools are now available to prevent and treat HIV infections, but Russia, Nigeria and the U.S. state of Florida each are struggling, for different reasons, to fully exploit the power of these tools.

Migrants Airlifted From a Libya in Turmoil

A two-part segment for PBS NewsHour from Libya, on a controversial program that flies migrants back to their home countries and on the future of ISIS in Libya.

A Special Kind of School

What does it mean to be a refugee? What is it like to live in and go to school at a refugee camp? "A Special Kind of School" takes young readers to Kenya to visit the classrooms of refugee students.

Cross-border Conservation Land Grabs

Has a laudable transnational anti-poaching initiative been hijacked by organized crime? This project investigates claims the Kruger National Park poaching wars are used to create eco-cocoons for the mega-rich.

The Struggle for Fish

In Gambia, authorities believe Chinese fishmeal factories will bring much needed investment to Africa’s smallest nation. Its residents disagree.

A Second Chance in Somalia

Can former fighters with a terrorist group be deradicalized and rehabilitated? An NGO in Somalia is trying to do just that with former Al-Shabab recruits who have defected from the group.

Mugabe's Last Days—And What Comes Next

Robert Mugabe's downfall after 37 years in power left beleaguered Zimbabweans euphoric, but the rise of Emmanuel Mnangagwa, aka The Crocodile, suggests that the rejoicing might be premature.

What Went Wrong? Citizen Reports of Foreign Aid in Kenya

The effectiveness of foreign aid is hotly debated, but the voices of aid recipients are often missing from the conversation. This project gathered reports from citizens using mobile phone surveys and then investigated their claims.

Prophets and Profits

While churches in the economic north are emptying out, those in the global south—especially in Africa—are growing. In Ghana, Evangelicalism and Pentecostalism are booming, but at what price?

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Nuwer

Rachel is a Brooklyn-based freelance science journalist who is writing a book about the illegal wildlife trade. She traveled to Malawi and South Africa to report on the war on poaching.

Meet the Journalist: Jake Naughton

Photographer Jake Naughton discusses his reporting on Uganda’s LGBT community following the notorious "Kill the Gays" bill. Though the bill was struck down, it created a cascade of effects.

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

This week: Why Pakistan and India are equipping their submarines with nuclear-tipped missiles, what life is like for ethnic minority Vietnamese living in Cambodia, and how armed groups have filled a power vacuum in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Europe Slams Its Gates

This week: A deep dive into the complexities of European migration, our grantees win an Emmy, and how the Internet hurt Myanmar overnight.

"The End of AIDS?" Wins an Emmy

Another big win PBS NewsHour, Science, and the Pulitzer Center, for "The End of AIDS?" Finding new ways to tell stories that matter on issues that affect us all.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.

Migration and Refugees Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans for middle school teachers, high school teachers and college professors introduce reporting connected to migration and the experiences of refugees.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

Facing Risk: Journalists and their Families

This lesson, designed for journalists and journalism students, uses the film "Facing Risk" to guide a conversation about the impact of reporting dangerous stories on journalists and their families.

To End AIDS: Addressing Community Needs

Students develop solutions for challenges in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Students will conduct in-depth research on their issues, create proposals, and present them.

Exploring Downstream: Water Resources

Through this webquest, students use several different projects on the "Downstream" web portal to examine the impact of water resources on a wide range of communities around the world.

Exploring Fragile States: Sudan

Sudan has been a "fragile state" for more than two decades. Through this webquest, students are able to explore this complex country using several different reporting projects on Sudan.

A Right to Water for Everyone?

This is a multi-week unit on water rights and access. Students examine the causes of water shortages across the globe and explore solutions to ensure that all people have access to clean, safe...

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.