Region

Africa

Morocco Embraces Multilingualism

Morocco has doubled down on multilingualism to prop up an education system widely seen as inferior to that of past generations. What does this mean for students and teachers?

Cairo's Drivers' Roundabout

Egypt's drivers say poor quality roads dictate that they break traffic rules. The country's road planners say it's pointless to make improvements if people won't abide by traffic regulations.

World Faces Global Sand Shortage

Sand is the key ingredient that makes modern life possible. And we are starting to run out. Vince Beiser talks about the crisis with Morning Edition's David Greene.   

Pathway to Peril

Scientists worry the next devastating disease could be born where animals and humans mix in a Third World slum – then cross the globe. Zika may have been a preview.

Can Biotechnology Save Africa?

African farmers already struggle to grow sufficient maize, which is a thirsty, fertilizer-hungry crop. What will happen as the climate changes and the population grows?

Justice Renewed: Liberia After War

Glenna Gordon and Jina Moore look at Liberia's efforts to restore law and justice -- for victims of sexual violence, for communities in conflict and for the nation as a whole.

Mothers of Ethiopia

In the U.S., a woman has a 1 in 4,800 chance of dying from complications due to pregnancy or childbirth in her lifetime. In Ethiopia, a woman has a 1 in 27 chance of dying. Hanna shares her experiences and observations in a five-part series on Mothers Of Ethiopia.

Heat of the Moment

Planet Earth's average temperature has risen about one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research. But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer.

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

Somaliland: A Land in Limbo

Somaliland, a breakaway region of Somalia, is Africa’s only fully unrecognized country. After breaking away from Somalia and claiming independence in 1991, the Somaliland government, in stark contrast to the failed state of Somalia, has constructed many facets of a functioning, stable state. Somaliland has carried out several Presidential elections and peaceful transfers of power.

Kenya: Uneasy Neighbors

Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp was for years among the world's most famous, home to the "Lost Boys" of southern Sudan and as many as 90,000 refugees and displaced persons. Today those still here are fighting for their lives, caught between "donor fatigue" and a struggle over limited resources with...

Guinea-Bissau: West Africa's New Achilles' Heel

An international network led by Latin American drug cartels and the Lebanese Islamist group Hezbollah has chosen West Africa, among the poorest and more corrupted corners of the world, as the nexus for illegal trade in cocaine, oil, counterfeit medicines, pirated music and human trafficking. International law enforcement officials...

Run or Hide? Seeking Refuge in Tanzania

When Bill Clinton Hadam's refugee family was approved for resettlement in the U.S., the boy's parents faced a "Sophie's Choice" dilemma: him or his sister. After escaping slaughter in Congo and Rwanda, the family waited in a Tanzanian camp for nearly a decade. Rape was common there, and Bill's teen...

Southern Africa: Sustainable Hunting?

The black rhino is emblematic of how civil war and corruption in Africa decimate endangered animal populations and rob local economies of potential sources of income. Black rhinos have declined from 65,000 in 1970 to 4,000 today due to crises in Mozambique, Angola, and, now, Zimbabwe.

Since...

This Week in Review: Escape From Timbuktu

Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the rare manuscripts smuggled from inside Timbuktu's hallowed libraries, child laborers in Burkina Faso and a conflict free tin mining initiative in the DRC.

This Week in Review: The Child Catchers

Senior Editor Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the Ethiopian and American parents misled by adoption agencies and the Iowa medics providing healthcare in rural Haiti.