Region

Africa

Paying Migrants to Stay

Brussels is betting on an ambitious plan to transform countries like Mali into places people will want to live. But will a makeover be enough to keep would-be migrants home?

Outsourcing the Dirty Work

Europe is partnering with Libyan militias to prevent African migrants from ever reaching Europe. The result is a detention-industrial complex that turns African migrants into commodities.

Art and Politics in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick covers Egypt's political transformation by talking with artists who are beginning to show their creativity after years of forced self-censorship.

Infra: Images from Eastern Congo

Richard Mosse is known for challenging convention on the photojournalist's role. His book Infra , with photographs of Eastern Congo, is as shocking and complex as the conflict it explores.

Libya: The Rebirth of a Nation

The revolution that toppled the regime of Col. Moammar Qaddafi brought Libya a sense of pride, hope and renewed engagement with the West, but ahead lies the challenge of building a democratic framework.

Arab Spring Meets Endless Summer

The words "surfing" and "Islam" do not generally go together. Yet in Morocco, on Islam's Western shore, surfing has become an increasingly popular sport, attracting waveriders from around the globe.

Zambia: AIDS at a Turning Point

AIDS activists are beginning a new fight against the disease after health workers went on strike in 2009 to protest the theft from Zambia's Ministry of Health.

Egypt: The Revolution Continues

In the wake of the uprising that ousted President Mubarak, Sharif Abdel Kouddous reports from Cairo, Egypt with Nicole Salazar on the struggle for democracy, social justice and economic reform.

Arab Spring in Syria, Egypt and Gaza

Few thought Tunisia's December 2010 uprising would so quickly spark revolts in the surrounding region. What will the Arab Spring mean for Syria, Egypt and Gaza?

This Week: The Atlas of Pentecostalism

Each day, an estimated 35,000 people join a Pentecostal church. Of the world's two billion Christians, a quarter are now Pentecostals—up from just 6 percent in 1980.

This Week: China's African Frontier

Veteran radio journalist and Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich has a knack for getting himself into—and just as important, out of—hard places. Earlier this year, Reese reported from inside Iran.

This Week: One Man, Seven Years

In 2012 an intrepid journalist adventurer proposed that we partner on a reporting project seven years in the making that would entail traveling 21,000 miles—on foot.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

This Week: Congo's Peacekeepers

Setting aside a dismal record of failure, incompetence and indifference, UN peacekeeping troops and the Democratic Republic of Congo's army seem to have finally joined forces to protect civilians.

This Week: Hunger: A Fact of Life

Crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa rank among the lowest in the world, and nearly a third of the region’s people are chronically malnourished.

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.