Region

Africa

Death of the Nile

The Nile serves as a lifeline to millions of people across East Africa and Egypt but is under threat from population growth, pollution and climate change.

One Year After the Revolution, Where Is Tunisia Heading?

On the one-year anniversary of the Tunisian revolution, a nation struggles with the transition from autocracy to democracy in the face of growing unemployment and religious conservatism.

Murky Waters in Ghana

In Accra, capital of Ghana, residents cope with water scarcity while the state water company rakes in cash from abroad.

The Promise of Life: Reproductive Choice in Africa

This reporting initiative partners African and US journalists to explore critical challenges in reproductive health and family planning—and what they mean for life, death and socio-economic stability.

Finding Home Again in Ivory Coast

After recent political violence divided communities, some in Ivory Coast look to local water management as a key to reconciliation, social cohesion and long-lasting peace.

Art and Politics in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick covers Egypt's political transformation by talking with artists who are beginning to show their creativity after years of forced self-censorship.

Infra: Images from Eastern Congo

Richard Mosse is known for challenging convention on the photojournalist's role. His book Infra , with photographs of Eastern Congo, is as shocking and complex as the conflict it explores.

Libya: The Rebirth of a Nation

The revolution that toppled the regime of Col. Moammar Qaddafi brought Libya a sense of pride, hope and renewed engagement with the West, but ahead lies the challenge of building a democratic framework.

Arab Spring Meets Endless Summer

The words "surfing" and "Islam" do not generally go together. Yet in Morocco, on Islam's Western shore, surfing has become an increasingly popular sport, attracting waveriders from around the globe.

Zambia: AIDS at a Turning Point

AIDS activists are beginning a new fight against the disease after health workers went on strike in 2009 to protest the theft from Zambia's Ministry of Health.

This Week: The White Plague

Pulitzer Center grantee Meera Senthilingam, in a report for CNN Health, notes that tuberculosis has long been known as a disease of poverty.

This Week: Terror at the Edge of the Sahara

In February, Pulitzer Center grantee Josh Hammer boarded a UN flight to Kidal, becoming the first journalist to visit the bleak outpost in the Malian desert since last November.

This Week: When the Aid Dries Up

When wealthy nations decide to punish poor nations for alleged bad behavior, it is not the leaders of the poor nations who suffer, but rather the poor themselves.

This Week: A Government Shutdown

A government crackdown against dissidents? No, this is a government crackdown against sexual orientation. Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni last week signed a law that criminalizes homosexual acts.

This Week: The Atlas of Pentecostalism

Each day, an estimated 35,000 people join a Pentecostal church. Of the world's two billion Christians, a quarter are now Pentecostals—up from just 6 percent in 1980.