Region

Africa

Broken Girls and Broken Boys—Trapped Under COVID-19 Lockdown (Part II)

Since the lockdown commenced in Nigeria, children experiencing abuse of all forms have been badly hit. Rescue centers haven’t been operating fully, places to escape are either non-existent in their area or too far away to run to, and many homes and shelters have refused to admit children for fear of contaminating the other kids with COVID-19 infection.

COVID-19: For Victims of Abuse, Social Distancing Makes Things Worse

While the months-long lockdown imposed by the government to check the spread of coronavirus lasted, activists and authorities in Nigeria reported an increase in gender-based violence as victims were forced to stay more closely with their abusers, and found it more difficult to seek help due to the restriction of movement.

After COVID: Feminist Policies Save Lives and Uphold Rights

The patriarchal policies across MENA came into full play during COVID-19 as women’s vulnerability and burden increased exponentially against a system that was, even before the pandemic, broken and unable to protect women.

The Crisis Egyptian Doctors Are Facing

A group of Egyptian doctors stopped working in response to the COVID-19 deaths of already 22 of their colleagues. The Medical Union of Egypt said the government neglects to equip doctors with the tools they need.

Mapping Makoko

Makoko, one of the most crowded slums in Lagos, Nigeria, is finally being mapped—a project intertwined with the fight for property rights in the community.

After Dictatorship

The world watched in awe as the Sudanese people brought about the downfall of long-time dictator Omar al-Bashir in April 2019. Can Sudan now excavate itself from 30 years of dictatorship?

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

Outsourcing Migrants

The Associated Press examines what happens to asylum-seekers when Europe and the United States close their doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries.

Dominion: Land Grab in the Name of Conservation

Land reform, or sleight of hand? Who benefited from the multimillion-dollar MalaMala deal in greater Kruger National Park? Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism follows the money trail of South Africa's most expensive land settlement.

Stroke Is a Global Epidemic

Stroke is the world's second-leading killer and is particularly deadly in developing nations. In Zambia, a Harvard doctor is training the next generation of neurologists to help turn the tide.

New Challenges in Senegal: Type 2 Diabetes

With the rise of obesity and diabetes in its population, Senegal is facing new challenges. While the factors causing this change may be obvious, the solutions are not always as simple.

Examining Domestic Violence in Lagos, Nigeria

Lagos' secretive culture has made it harder to tackle domestic violence. Regardless, women are resisting the secrecy, changing the culture, and speaking about their experiences.

Exodus in the Indian Ocean

In a little-known archipelago in the western Indian Ocean, a migration crisis that has claimed up to 50,000 lives is unfolding largely unnoticed by the outside world.

Meet the Journalist: Roxanne Scott

In 1960, about 100,000 turkeys in England suddenly died. Could grain contamination be the cause? Roxanne Scott explores how Nigerian farmers are planning to recover from aflatoxin contamination.

Meet the Journalist: Deborah Bloom

In a densely populated village outside Mombasa in Kenya, the effects of industrial pollution continue to harm inhabitants. Deborah Bloom chronicles an activist's fight against it.

Meet the Journalist: Yasmin Bendaas

Yasmin Bendaas discusses reporting in Algeria—a 2012 project on the disappearing tradition of facial tattoos among the Chaouia and a current project on the effect of climate change on sheepherders.

Meet the Journalist: Jon Cohen

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida have each had difficulty mounting a strong response to HIV/AIDS, at a time when neighboring countries or states have made progress in bringing their epidemics to an end.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Journalist Tom Gardner discusses a two-part series of articles exploring Ethiopia's so-called "development state" and the crisis of expectations driving mass protest and exodus.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Tom Gardner discusses his reporting as he follows the railway from Addis Ababa to the Djibouti coast examining efforts of the Ethiopian government to use grand infrastructure to develop a poor region.

'Losing Earth' Curricular Materials

Reading comprehension tools, activities and other resources to bring "Losing Earth," The New York Times Magazine's special issue on climate change, into the classroom and beyond.