Projects

Launched October 23, 2019 Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans
Canada wants to supply New England with cheap, "clean" hydropower. But the region's mega-dams carry hidden costs to Inuit culture, the environment, and even the climate.
Launched October 21, 2019 Sonia Faleiro
In August 2019, India scrapped Kashmir's special status, moving in extra troops, suspending communication, and arresting thousands. This is the story of the women and children who were left behind.
Launched October 17, 2019 Michaela Haas
Environmentalists, cities, and owners of beachfront homes are engaged in bitter battles over how to save the coastline from rising sea levels.
Launched October 17, 2019 James Whitlow Delano
A mysterious illness has taken the lives of 15 out of 180 members of a clan of Malaysia’s last hunter gatherers, the Batek.
Launched October 15, 2019 Nate Hegyi
Are the super rich better equipped than the federal government to save America's disappearing wildlands?
Launched October 14, 2019 Nádia Pontes, Bruno Kelly
Surrounded by the Amazon rainforest, some 400 families from the Middle Juruá Extractive Reserve transform the andiroba and murumuru that they collect from the forest into raw material for industry.
Launched October 14, 2019 Allison Herrera
Reporter Allison Herrera explores a law in Oklahoma called "Failure to Protect," meant to decrease the number of abused children. Sometimes, it's the woman and not the abuser who does more time.
Launched October 14, 2019 Ayanna Eva Dickinson
The Chocoan Rainforest is one of the last coastal rainforests left on earth. A handful of groups and organizations in Ecuador have channeled the practice of participatory conservation in order to combat the ongoing destruction. 
Launched October 11, 2019 Tony Briscoe, Patrick M. O’Connell
Climate change is not only causing a crisis for our oceans and coasts, but it is also having a profound impact on the Great Lakes region. The Tribune visits each lake to examine the consequences.
Launched October 9, 2019 Mauricio Monteiro Filho
The stateless south of the Brazilian Amazon is the theatre for the explosive combination between unbridled land-grabbing and massive illegal logging.
Launched October 8, 2019 Jim Heaney, Ryan Schnurr
The project addresses the future of Great Lakes Rust Belt cities, examining the effect of climate change on infrastructure, equity, demographics, water quality, environment, and economic development.
Launched October 8, 2019 Ervin E. Dyer, PhD
In Port au Prince, Pastor Julio Volcy believes that to build a better Haiti, he must first build stronger Christians, preparing them to withstand poverty and oppression by living lives of integrity.
Launched October 8, 2019 Nathan Eagle
This project explores Hawaii’s unique island landscape and the crucial role watersheds play in mitigating climate change on Hawaii’s water resources, native species, and overall economy.
Launched October 7, 2019 David Abel, Andy Laub
As climate change edges the endangered North Atlantic right whale closer to extinction, saving the iconic species may require drastically curtailing North America’s most valuable fishery.
Launched October 7, 2019 Melissa Chan, Heriberto Araújo
As the world's largest consumer of soy, China's hunger drives Brazil's sales. How the Amazon fits into China's food security policy and Belt and Road Initiative—and what that means for the world.
Launched October 3, 2019 Jessica Prokop, Amanda Cowan
After Motel 6 gave his name to immigration agents in 2017, a Washington man’s family was torn apart. The Columbian reports from the U.S.-Mexico border, where the family is navigating a life divided.
Launched October 1, 2019 Rodrigo Pedroso
Catholic missionaries first arrived in the Amazon five centuries ago. Who are they and what are they doing now?
Launched October 1, 2019 Tish Sanghera, Disha Shetty
To boost economic growth, India is granting environmental clearances fast. But many projects ignore environmental laws, disregard Indigenous rights, and harm India’s last remaining natural resources.
Launched October 1, 2019 Jon Cohen
Despite sharp international criticism, a Russian geneticist is pushing forward a project to edit embryos of a deaf couple so their children won't inherit the mutation that impairs their hearing.
Launched September 30, 2019 Camila DeChalus
The U.S. government and migrants seeking asylum find themselves in a precarious situation as the situation on the border worsens.
Launched September 26, 2019 Nestor Ramos, Anush Elbakyan
Come with us as we explore Cape Cod to better understand what climate change is doing here, what it means for the future of this beloved place, and what the cost of inaction could be.
Launched September 26, 2019 Daniel Merino
In summer 2018, Japan experienced the realities of a climate-changed earth. The worst heatwave in the country's history killed over a thousand people and shattered records across the nation.
Launched September 25, 2019 Jacob Kushner, Allison Shelley
One decade after the deadliest natural disaster of the century, Pulitzer grantees return to examine aid, trade, and a new city created by the catastrophe.
Launched September 24, 2019 Mara Régia di Perna, Ana Cristina Moreira dos Santos
This year the Brazilian government has authorized the use of 325 pesticides. In Lucas do Rio Verde in the Amazon state of Mato Grosso, the terrible effects of one of these pesticides, Paraquat, was accidentally sprayed over the population back in 2006, can still be seen. It resulted in high cancer...