Projects

Launched November 26, 2019 Dan Schwartz
Legend tells of an Andean society that lived before Christ and died by the heat of three suns. Andeans say this old ending has returned as global warming. Communities are building lakes to prepare.
Launched November 20, 2019 Hani Zaitoun
Hani Zaitoun examines Estonia's defense capabilities and its special relationship with its Russian neighbor and the Russian ethnic minority that makes up almost 30 percent of Estonia's population.
Launched November 18, 2019 Mariana Rivas
With the recent announcement that all stateless babies born of Venezuelan parents would receive Colombian citizenship, the international community saw it as a victory, a brave response in the face of crisis. But these refugee families’ problems are far from solved. 
Launched November 6, 2019 Amna Nawaz, Frank Carlson
Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.
Launched November 5, 2019 Vandana Menon
To whom does the forest belong? To the people, the animals, or the state?
Launched October 31, 2019 Audrey Henson
Dementia is not a new concept to Japan. However, reishi mushrooms are.
Launched October 28, 2019 Gregory Scruggs
Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?
Launched October 28, 2019 Megan O’Toole, Jillian Kestler-D’Amours
A dispute over land ownership is at the center of fierce debate around a planned extension to Canada's Trans Mountain pipeline, which would cut through dozens of First Nations communities.
Launched October 23, 2019 Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans
Canada wants to supply New England with cheap, "clean" hydropower. But the region's mega-dams carry hidden costs to Inuit culture, the environment, and even the climate.
Launched October 15, 2019 Nate Hegyi
Are the super rich better equipped than the federal government to save America's disappearing wildlands?
Launched October 14, 2019 Ayanna Eva Dickinson
The Chocoan Rainforest is one of the last coastal rainforests left on earth. A handful of groups and organizations in Ecuador have channeled the practice of participatory conservation in order to combat the ongoing destruction. 
Launched October 11, 2019 Tony Briscoe
Climate change is not only causing a crisis for our oceans and coasts, but it is also having a profound impact on the Great Lakes region. The Tribune visits each lake to examine the consequences.
Launched October 8, 2019 Nathan Eagle
This project explores Hawaii’s unique island landscape and the crucial role watersheds play in mitigating climate change on Hawaii’s water resources, native species, and overall economy.
Launched October 1, 2019 Rodrigo Pedroso
Catholic missionaries first arrived in the Amazon five centuries ago. Who are they and what are they doing now?
Launched October 1, 2019 Jon Cohen
Despite sharp international criticism, a Russian geneticist is pushing forward a project to edit embryos of a deaf couple so their children won't inherit the mutation that impairs their hearing.
Launched September 30, 2019 Camila DeChalus
The U.S. government and migrants seeking asylum find themselves in a precarious situation as the situation on the border worsens.
Launched September 26, 2019 Nestor Ramos, Anush Elbakyan
Come with us as we explore Cape Cod to better understand what climate change is doing here, what it means for the future of this beloved place, and what the cost of inaction could be.
Launched September 26, 2019 Daniel Merino
In summer 2018, Japan experienced the realities of a climate-changed earth. The worst heatwave in the country's history killed over a thousand people and shattered records across the nation.
Launched September 23, 2019 Kalpana Jain
What does the rise of a new militant Hinduism under India's Modi government mean for women and young people, and what does resistance to it look like?
Launched September 18, 2019 Tim Sullivan, Cedar Attanasio
The Associated Press examines what happens to asylum-seekers when Europe and the United States close their doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries.
Launched September 10, 2019 Fabio Pontes, Jardy Lopes
This project analyzes how the fire in the Amazon rainforest impacted the triple frontier between Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru.  
Launched September 9, 2019 Hal Bernton, Steve Ringman
The Bering Sea's winter ice has helped to sustain a remarkable abundance of sea life. For the past two years, it's been gone, and scientists are scrambling to figure out what that means for the future.
Launched September 9, 2019 Marcio Pimenta
By land and air, a photo essay that shows fire in the heart of the Amazon.
Launched August 28, 2019 Amy Martin, Nick Mott
Should we drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? Why? Why not? Who gets to decide? Travel north with the producers of the podcast Threshold to explore this wild and complicated place.