Issue

Migration and Refugees

Migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of climate and business on migration, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their own cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Migration and Refugees exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Migration and Refugees

Ready to Learn

Last December, Estefanía Rebellón volunteered to help migrant families in Tijuana, Mexico. The trip inspired her to start a school for migrant kids. TIME for Kids spoke with her about the program.

Holding On to Hope

What happens when migrants arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border? TIME for Kids travels to Tijuana, Mexico, to find out.

Musician Profile: Abdul Mozid

Abdul Mozid's father was forced into labor in Myanmar and later died on a hunger strike at a refugee camp in Bangladesh. Mozid remembers him through his music, and sings songs about Rohingya plight.

Guatemala: Repatriation of Migrants

Hundreds of migrants from Central America die every year trying to cross the U.S. Mexico border illegally. This story traces the process of finding, identifying and returning their bodies home.

A Table For All

In the film A Table for All refugees and asylees seek employment in the New York City restaurant industry. Adapting to a kitchen in a new city, they find common ground in food and cultural exchange.

Mestizo Roots of California Exceptionalism

California has its faults, but innovation, tolerance for immigrants, and reverence for the environment are not among them. What are the roots of California exceptionalism?

Meet the Journalist: Negar Azimi

As new museums and universities are erected in the Gulf, Negar Azimi reports on the complexities surrounding the use of low-wage migrant labor, with a focus on a group of artist-activists.