Issue

Migration and Refugees

Migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of climate and business on migration, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their own cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Migration and Refugees exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Migration and Refugees

Libya: What's Next?

The Pulitzer Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted an event on the migrant crisis and geopolitical issues in Libya moderated by Indira Lakshmanan and featuring with Ambassador Wafa Bughaighis of Libya, Pulitzer Center-supported journalists, and regional experts.

Winny Contreras: The Long Commute

A man from Guanajuato, Mexico who crossed the border to work on a farm in Connecticut contends with being away from his family for years to help support their dreams and build a new life for them.

The Megacity Initiative

The Megacity Initiative is a new media venture investigating the sustainable development of burgeoning urban centers around the world in order to more prudently integrate future city dwellers.

Beijing's 'Rat Tribe'

Living beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks are an estimated 1 million migrant workers. Dubbed the "Rat Tribe", these low-wage workers make a home in windowless basement cubicles.

The Parsis: India's Shrinking Population

Facing a growing city and shrinking population, Mumbai's Parsis are urgently seeking ways to care for their elderly, preserve their cultural heritage, and ensure the survival of their religion.

The Last Refugees: Bhutanese in Nepal

Bhutanese refugees in Nepal never got much international attention and now, after more than 20 years living in camps, they are being resettled around the world. Will their cultural identity survive?