Issue

Health

In Health, Pulitzer Center grantees delve into some of the world’s most pressing health issues and challenges. Featuring a wide range of topics from chronic illnesses to outbreaks and epidemics to reproductive health and public health systems, our reporting looks at the breadth of health issues found across the globe.

We also look at the global footprint of cancer, which kills more people than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. We examine the disproportionate burden placed on poorer countries, as well as the medical and business innovations that allow for treatment once thought too costly or too difficult to deliver.

Other projects look at mental health, including the trauma caused by conflicts like the wars in Syria and Yemen, the effects of pollution on communities, and safety and injury-related deaths, such as in our ongoing Roads Kill project.

By telling the stories of patients, caregivers, and scientists, our reporters are drawing outbreak comparisons and providing lessons for prevention. They are also taking on the challenge of communicating technical information to the lay ear, and ultimately filling the gap between the scientific and public understanding of health crises.

Health

More QC Museums Reopening

The eight-year-old Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, in a historic Rock Island, Illinois, building, reopened June 26, but doesn’t draw many visitors, according to co-director Margie Cain, who runs the facility with her husband Chris.

It’s Hard to Breathe in Maracaibo

There was a COVID-19 outbreak at a popular market in Maracaibo, Venezuela’s second most populous city. Everything there has changed. This is the story.

QC Museums Reopening

Though Illinois allowed indoor museums to re-open June 26, while the Covid-19 pandemic still raged across the nation, museums and historic homes in the Quad-Cities have taken different approaches to re-opening.

'It Was an Inconvenience, but It Was Also Devastating,' Greensboro Mom Says. Pandemic Worsens NC's Child Care Shortage.

Despite millions of dollars in public relief to child care centers, more than 1,500 North Carolina programs — one in four — remain closed, according to data from the state Department of Health and Human Services. Others now operate at reduced capacity. This shortage arrives at a moment when many parents — eager to return to work as their unemployment benefits run out — desperately search for placements.

Poet Kwame Dawes Visits Banneker High School

On Friday, December 17, Kwame Dawes, a poet, professor, and Pulitzer Center grantee, visited Benjamin Banneker Academic High School in Washington D.C.. During the visit, Dawes shared his latest project, "Voices from Haiti," an exploration of Haiti one year after the devastating January 2010 earthquake.

Related Events