Issue

Health

In Health, Pulitzer Center grantees delve into some of the world’s most pressing health issues and challenges. Featuring a wide range of topics from chronic illnesses to outbreaks and epidemics to reproductive health and public health systems, our reporting looks at the breadth of health issues found across the globe.

We also look at the global footprint of cancer, which kills more people than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. We examine the disproportionate burden placed on poorer countries, as well as the medical and business innovations that allow for treatment once thought too costly or too difficult to deliver.

Other projects look at mental health, including the trauma caused by conflicts like the wars in Syria and Yemen, the effects of pollution on communities, and safety and injury-related deaths, such as in our ongoing Roads Kill project.

By telling the stories of patients, caregivers, and scientists, our reporters are drawing outbreak comparisons and providing lessons for prevention. They are also taking on the challenge of communicating technical information to the lay ear, and ultimately filling the gap between the scientific and public understanding of health crises.

Health

A Bot to Watch Over Me

By 2025, Japan will face a shortage of 37,700 care workers. Robots are starting to find their way to households and nursing homes to fill the gap.

'Virtually Able'

Japan’s average life expectancy was the highest in the world, at 83.7 years in 2015. But what’s the point of living longer if you are not happy? Can seniors find happiness in a virtual journey?

Can Tech Sustain a Super-Aged Japan?

Japan has the largest percentage of older people in the world, with 27.3 percent of their citizens 65 and older. It has turned to technologies from VR to robotics to solve challenges of super-aging.

Memory Keepers

After historic protests in 2016, has the reality of women's rights in Poland improved?

Mothers of Ethiopia

In the U.S., a woman has a 1 in 4,800 chance of dying from complications due to pregnancy or childbirth in her lifetime. In Ethiopia, a woman has a 1 in 27 chance of dying. Hanna shares her experiences and observations in a five-part series on Mothers Of Ethiopia.

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

Cuba: Tropical Depression

Six months after Fidel Castro's exit, Lygia Navarro explores the hidden epidemic of depression in Cuba. With the wait for social and economic transformation dragging on, many Cubans find escape from the difficulty of day-to-day life in black-market sleeping pills. Although Cuba's medical system is lauded internationally, the government...

Ecuador: Jungle Tensions

Chevron is accused of having dumped 18 billion gallons of toxic waste in Ecuador’s Amazonian rainforest, and local residents are determined to hold them accountable.

Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine the ways in which the disease has shaped their lives. The journey brings him in touch with people who tell their stories, share their lives and teach him about resilience,...

Heroes of HIV: HIV in the Caribbean

With HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, Caribbean islands that conjure visions of sun and sand now highlight the interplay between poverty and the epidemic in this hemisphere.

World Tuberculosis Day

Targeting care to poor and developing communities reduces stigma and deters development of drug-resistant strains of TB. Can a new diagnostic test be the turning point in the fight against TB?

Related Events