Issue

Governance

The balance of power between strong states was for decades the dominant issue in discussions of international security. But today, it is fragile states that are seen by many as posing potentially greater threats. Weak infrastructures, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide.

As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger states, as well as more effective solutions to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

In Governance, you'll find reporting from around the world—from East Timor to Haiti, from Guinea Bissau to Afghanistan. The reporting demonstrates the dangers weak states pose—and also the international interventions that appear to be making a difference.

 

Governance

Syria: My Lawless Summer

The Syrian National Coalition projects a unified front but is devoid of legal agency. Mothers in exile hope for newborns to be certified at birth; students wonder who will validate their exams.

Afghanistan Undone

A journalist returns to the fragile country five years after she was kidnapped. What will happen after US troops pull out next year?

Pulitzer Center journalists cover Afghanistan

Tatum Taylor, Pulitzer Center

As the post-election drama continues and publicity over the US military's counterinsurgency strategies grows, journalists are increasingly turning their attention towards Afghanistan. Pulitzer Center journalists have been consistently reporting from Afghanistan in order to inform the conversation, and we wanted to share with you the range of their work.

Marco Vernaschi named finalist in international photo competition

Pulitzer-supported photojournalist Marco Vernaschi was among 10 finalists selected at the Ojo de Pez Award for Human Values, a major international photography competition, for his in-depth examination of the illegal activity within Guinea Bissau, "West Africa's New Achilles' Heel." He and his fellow finalists were chosen from 620 entries.