Issue

Governance

The balance of power between strong states was for decades the dominant issue in discussions of international security. But today, it is fragile states that are seen by many as posing potentially greater threats. Weak infrastructures, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide.

As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger states, as well as more effective solutions to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

In Governance, you'll find reporting from around the world—from East Timor to Haiti, from Guinea Bissau to Afghanistan. The reporting demonstrates the dangers weak states pose—and also the international interventions that appear to be making a difference.

 

Governance

Part II: Chile's Enduring Rifts

Former President Michelle Bachelet fell short of a majority and about half of Chile's eligible voters stayed home in Chile's recent election. A look at a critical political choice in a new democracy.

Film: Congo/Women

On mothers Day in Norway the NGO Congo Women projected a video including images by Marcus Bleasdale onto the facade of the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway.

Pulitzer Center Journalist Discusses Peacebuilding

Imani Rucker, a tenth grade student at New Directions Alternative Program in Arlington, Virginia submitted this response to a December presentation on the U.N. Peacebuilding Commission by Pulitzer Center journalist, Jina Moore.

Ninth Grade Students Learn from a Crisis Reporter

Students in the 9th grade have spent the semester working on action projects built around international crises such as the quake in Haiti and the war in Afghanistan. They have been spearheading plans that range from raising money for schools to establishing pen pals in distressed countries. On Monday, May 3, the 9th grade students attended a presentation by and discussion with Jason Motlagh, a reporter who has spent the last several years writing from Afghanistan. He also represented the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, with whom the students have been working.