Issue

Governance

The balance of power between strong states was for decades the dominant issue in discussions of international security. But today, it is fragile states that are seen by many as posing potentially greater threats. Weak infrastructures, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide.

As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger states, as well as more effective solutions to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

In Governance, you'll find reporting from around the world—from East Timor to Haiti, from Guinea Bissau to Afghanistan. The reporting demonstrates the dangers weak states pose—and also the international interventions that appear to be making a difference.

 

Governance

Valley of Unrest

There are now nearly one million Indian troops stationed in Kashmir—more than at the height of the insurgency in the Nineties. The Muslim-majority region and its residents face a rising tide of Hindu nationalism.

The 1857 Project: Extracting the Poison of Racism From America’s Soul

In its spring 2020 print issue, GJR explores the history of race in the Land of Dred Scott. Call it the 1857 project because one of the most important chapters in the nation’s story occurred here with the Dred Scott decision reading blacks out of the Constitution and the Lincoln-Douglas debates the next year over whether America could endure part slave and part free. 

Government Transparency in the Times of Coronavirus

The media must now rely on the government for information about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Are governmental authorities taking advantage of this crisis to further suppress the media in the MENA region?

Pastor Battles Inequality in Haiti

In Port au Prince, Pastor Julio Volcy believes that to build a better Haiti, he must first build stronger Christians, preparing them to withstand poverty and oppression by living lives of integrity.

Haiti Earthquake: Ten Years Later

On Jan. 12, 2010, Haiti suffered its most devastating disaster. More than 300,000 souls were lost, 1.5 million people were injured and an equal number made homeless. What has happened since?

A Revolution for Puerto Rico's Afro-Latinos

In the midst of Puerto Rico's political crisis, its black communities fight for justice to address invisible racism, police oppression, gentrification, substandard schools, and economic disparities.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

Meet The Journalist: Umar Farooq

Collective punishment is often reported on, but Pakistan's tribal areas are one of the few places where it is written into the law itself. What is life like for people on the ground?

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Migration and Refugees Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans for middle school teachers, high school teachers and college professors introduce reporting connected to migration and the experiences of refugees.

Technology and Activism in Mexico

The following global affairs lesson plan for history, ELA, Spanish and Humanities teachers investigates the use of technology in Mexico to combat corruption and the impacts of that activism.