Issue

Governance

The balance of power between strong states was for decades the dominant issue in discussions of international security. But today, it is fragile states that are seen by many as posing potentially greater threats. Weak infrastructures, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide.

As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger states, as well as more effective solutions to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

In Governance, you'll find reporting from around the world—from East Timor to Haiti, from Guinea Bissau to Afghanistan. The reporting demonstrates the dangers weak states pose—and also the international interventions that appear to be making a difference.

 

Governance

Government Transparency in the Times of Coronavirus

The media must now rely on the government for information about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Are governmental authorities taking advantage of this crisis to further suppress the media in the MENA region?

How Coronavirus Changed the Lebanese Revolution

In this episode of Almostajad, we meet Lebanese journalists John Qassir and Diana Muqalled. They discuss the impact of the coronavirus and lockdown on the revolution and how the Lebanese government used this time to create even stricter policies. We also listen to protestors who describe the changing trajectory of the uprising.

The Moving Border: Part Two, the South

In episode two of this two-part investigation, "The Moving Border" visits Tapachula, Mexico to investigate "externalization" — the increasing push by countries like the U.S. to keep refugees in their poorer neighbors.

The Many Varieties of Voter Suppression

America’s decentralized election system fails voters in a common way. As each state adopts independent mesaures, the electoral stresses caused by COVID-19 and laws that aim to ensure the security of American elections may increase voter suppression in the country. 

The Moving Border: Part One, the North

In episode one of this two-part investigation, "The Moving Border" examines the increasing pressure put on asylum seekers by both the Trump administration and Mexican officials.

In the Shadows of the Pandemic (Spanish)

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, people living with HIV in Peru not only face risk of infection but also hunger and barriers to treatment. Transgender people and migrants have been hit the hardest.

Broken Justice

Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.

Is Israel a Dying Democracy?

The famous line about Israel is that it's "the only democracy in the Middle East." But the foundation of its liberal democracy are crumbling — and may be in worse shape than most people understand.

Southeast Asia in the Strongman Era

The "new authoritarianism" is on the rise in Southeast Asia, personified by Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines and Thailand's Prayuth Chan Ocha. Are they not just the present, but the future as well?

Renovating Villa 31

Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?

The Silent War

The rivalry between 'Democratic Taiwan' and the 'China Model' has lasted for seven decades. Has it now reached a tipping point?

He Did the Crime, She Did the Time

Reporter Allison Herrera explores a law in Oklahoma called "Failure to Protect," meant to decrease the number of abused children. Sometimes, it's the woman and not the abuser who does more time.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Tom Gardner discusses his reporting as he follows the railway from Addis Ababa to the Djibouti coast examining efforts of the Ethiopian government to use grand infrastructure to develop a poor region.

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

The Country a U.S. Corporation Left Behind

Students explore the impacts of the century-long relationship between Alcoa, an American corporation, and Suriname. They then debate the terms of Alcoa's exit from the country.