Issue

Environment and Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last 50 years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Environment and Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to the impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting by Nathaniel Rich on the response to global warming during the 1979-1989 decade—an article that takes up the entire issue of The New York Times Magazine. Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other stories covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji. How does the melting Arctic ice cap affect our lives? How do overfishing and exploitation of mineral resources beneath the ocean’s surface jeopardize food sources need to sustain the planet’s ever-expanding population?

As part of the Pulitzer Center's long-term support for climate change reporting, the Rainforest Journalism Fund was established to provide capacity for local journalists operating in the rainforest regions of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, as well as international journalists reporting from those regions. The Fund represents a major investment in global environmental and climate reporting, with plans to support nearly 200 original reporting projects along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global rainforest issues such as deforestation and climate change.

 

Environment and Climate Change

Drica: Resistance in the Quilombos of the Trombetas River

A young Brazilian activist is responsible for an association of six afro-Brazilian communities that face the threat of environmental destruction. Her story is the third in the "Rainforest Defenders" series, presenting five young leaders fighting to preserve the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

A Life Fighting Against Hydroelectricity

Indigenous people from the south of the Brazilian rainforest have mobilized to prevent 138 hydroelectricity plants from invading the Juruena river basin.

Juruena Resists: A Historic Battle for a River (Portuguese)

Jair Bolsonaro's government's policies threaten Indigenous communities in the Juruena Basin region of Mato Grosso, Brazil. For over three decades, communities have been struggling to bar the construction of large hydroelectric dams, which affect their territories and ways of life.

A Life Against Dams (Spanish)

Indigenous peoples and ribereños in the southern Brazilian Amazon are mobilizing to prevent the invasion of more than 138 hydroelectric structures in the Juruena River watershed that would exacerbate deforestation metrics throughout the region.

Manipur: Where the Islands Float

The floating islands of Loktak Lake, known as “phumdis,” are home to unique animals and plants and an indigenous community—and are threatened by development.

Cold Comfort

Season two of Threshold takes listeners to the homes, hunting grounds, and melting coastlines of Arctic peoples, where climate change isn’t an abstract concept, but a part of daily life.

Puerto Rico: Crisis in the Caribbean

Weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, the island continues its battle for food, water and electricity. Ryan Michalesko reports on the fate of this U.S. territory and its people.

Climate Change and Sheepherding in Algeria

Although Algeria is a low emitter of greenhouse gasses, environmental changes like lower rainfall, higher temperatures, and longer cycles of drought have slashed profits for Algerian sheepherders.

New Cold War

An examination of the ongoing geopolitical transformation of the Arctic along the old Cold War frontline from Alaska through Canada and Greenland.

Meet the Journalist: Justin Catanoso

Pope Francis encounters the limits of his moral authority in Latin America, where his encyclical on climate change and environmental protection is met with scorn from those who need to be influenced.

Where Can I Be Safe?

A 12-year old girl questions the fate of the earth at the August 1 launch of the NYT Magazine article, "Losing Earth," by author Nathaniel Rich, at The Times Center in New York.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.