Issue

Environment and Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last 50 years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Environment and Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to the impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting by Nathaniel Rich on the response to global warming during the 1979-1989 decade—an article that takes up the entire issue of The New York Times Magazine. Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other stories covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji. How does the melting Arctic ice cap affect our lives? How do overfishing and exploitation of mineral resources beneath the ocean’s surface jeopardize food sources need to sustain the planet’s ever-expanding population?

As part of the Pulitzer Center's long-term support for climate change reporting, the Rainforest Journalism Fund was established to provide capacity for local journalists operating in the rainforest regions of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, as well as international journalists reporting from those regions. The Fund represents a major investment in global environmental and climate reporting, with plans to support nearly 200 original reporting projects along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global rainforest issues such as deforestation and climate change.

 

Environment and Climate Change

Death of the Nile

The Nile serves as a lifeline to millions of people across East Africa and Egypt but is under threat from population growth, pollution and climate change.

Exotic Pet Owners of Beijing

Portraits of Beijing's exotic pet owners and their animals reveals the extent of a new growing industry that experts believe is contributing to biodiversity loss across the world.

Pulitzer Center Reporting Part of Theater Production on Water

A recent theatrical production brought a Pulitzer Center-sponsored article from the pages of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer to the stage in New York City as a part of Jane Catherine Shaw's Thirst: Memory of Water. Drawing on sources ranging from Leonardo's Treatise on Water to first person accounts, the show brought together disparate voices to address the practical and spiritual aspects of one of life's essentials—water.

Gallagher's "China's Growing Sands" Selected as Finalist by the Lumix Festival for Young Photojournalism

The 2nd Lumix Festival for Young Photojournalism 2010 will be the premiere for the »Lumix Multimedia Award« including prize money of 5,000 euros for the best journalistic multimedia production.

170 photographers from 41 countries have applied for this award which will be given in addition to the FreeLens Award. The chance to create another narrative layer beyond the photographs seems to be used by more and more photographers.

World Water Day Writing Contest Winner: A Drop of Grace

For many of us, it's hard to envision a time when water will not be readily available. From drinking to cleaning, water is a constant and often underappreciated presence in our lives. But for 884 million people clean water is a precious commodity. And if we continue to deplete our clean water sources, it will inevitably affect us all.

Water and Peace: Security's Undercurrent

Specialists from across sectors gathered at the National Geographic Society on World Water Day, Monday, March 22, to share information on an issue seemingly so simple we often take it for granted.

But you don't have to be an expert to know about water.

Just ask the man who sold me my coffee today. "Well, that's obvious," he said of the event, "it doesn't matter what else people have; without water, they're going to go after each other to get it."