Issue

Environment and Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last 50 years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Environment and Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to the impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting by Nathaniel Rich on the response to global warming during the 1979-1989 decade—an article that takes up the entire issue of The New York Times Magazine. Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other stories covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji. How does the melting Arctic ice cap affect our lives? How do overfishing and exploitation of mineral resources beneath the ocean’s surface jeopardize food sources need to sustain the planet’s ever-expanding population?

As part of the Pulitzer Center's long-term support for climate change reporting, the Rainforest Journalism Fund was established to provide capacity for local journalists operating in the rainforest regions of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, as well as international journalists reporting from those regions. The Fund represents a major investment in global environmental and climate reporting, with plans to support nearly 200 original reporting projects along with annual regional conferences designed to raise the level of reporting on global rainforest issues such as deforestation and climate change.

 

Environment and Climate Change

Rwanda: Climate Change and Mountain Gorillas

In Rwanda, increased floods, droughts, and landslides have caused deaths and destroyed homes. How are mountain gorillas and people living near their habitat impacted by and adapting to climate change?

China Pushes Back Against Air Pollution

China is seen as a poster child for smog, but it is pushing back against air pollution with a wind and solar power rollout that also has big ramifications for the fight against climate change.

Climate Change in the Maldives

As conversations about climate change gather steam in the Maldives, many question whether the government is taking serious concerns that businesses can no longer protect visitors from rising seas.

Smoke and Mirrors

Globally, cooking smoke causes over 4 million deaths per year. Can improved cookstoves save lives, the environment and is the promise of ‘clean cooking’ fulfilled in Malawi?

New York City's Water Maintenance

New York City spends millions a year to maintain some of the highest quality tap water in the world–without filtering. Yet, some reports indicate this trend may be coming to an end.

Water Infrastructure in New York City

Over the next 20 years, New York will pour millions of dollars into upgrading its water infrastructure. Our student reporters explain the importance of this upgrade.

Chinese Chemical Plants Ruin Sun River

"If you want to clean up the river, you need to close the chemical plants and stop throwing the garbage. Then the goverment can offer the water to this river again." 

The Water Problem in Dong Lian

The rope of the bucket got longer and longer, which they used to get the water from the wells. Everyday the well became dirtier and dirtier.