Issue

Criminal Justice

It costs $13 million per year to hold each of the 40 prisoners at Guantánamo Bay. Where does the money go? How do police profit from seized property? What is it like to be one of 2.7 million children with a parent in jail or prison? What programs have succeeded in the U.S. and elsewhere to reduce recidivism?

These are a few of the questions Pulitzer Center grantees ask in the stories highlighted in Criminal Justice.

Innovative initiatives include a transformational theater piece based on a three-year investigation into solitary confinement. The play was performed on Alcatrez Island. A photography project features the work of court-involved youth who depict life on the streets of San Francisco. This project provided opportunities for youth to showcase their work while shining light on the criminal justice system in California.

Funding for Carol Rosenberg’s ongoing reporting on Guantánamo Bay comes from the Hewlett Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and other sources. The Art for Justice Fund, established by philanthropist Agnes Gund, is helping to support our reporting on mass incarceration. Omidyar Network has provided financial support for “Taken”—our project on civil asset forfeiture. The Pulitzer Center extends its heartfelt thanks to our generous donors.

Criminal Justice

On the Ground with the Last Nazi Hunters

Kinstler traveled to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Ludwigsburg, Germany, to observe the work of Central Office prosecutors, who scour archives in the pursuit of sorely belated justice.

The Boyfriend System: Migrant Life in Qatar

Zina laws treat sex and pregnancy out of wedlock as crimes punishable by imprisonment. But without means to seek legal recourse, it is mostly low-skilled migrant woman who face charges.

Germany: The Last Nazi Hunters

Since 1958, a handful of German government prosecutors have sought to bring members of the Third Reich to trial. But the world’s biggest cold-case investigation will soon be shut down

Convict of 302: Death Penalty in Pakistan

The Pakistani public perceives the reinstatement of the death penalty as a tool to curb terrorism and crime, but many are unaware that not everyone on death row receives a fair trial.

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