Issue

COVID-19

Public health experts warned of the threat of global pandemics for decades, but governments at every level largely ignored them. Even the recent onset of deadly epidemics like SARS and H1NI were not enough to compel countries to prepare for the inevitable. Now, as COVID-19 spreads across the globe, countries as wide ranging as China, Italy, the United States, Sweden, Brazil, and the Democratic Republic of Congo struggle to respond.

The Pulitzer Center and its grantees are focusing on telling the full global story of the coronavirus pandemic. Their work explores topics ranging from the efforts to flatten the curve and the search for a vaccine to the impact of the crisis on the most vulnerable, including undocumented immigrants, communities of color, students, and those with little or no access to clean water. 

At a time of scarce journalism resources, the Pulitzer Center's Coronavirus News Collaboration Challenge is encouraging innovative approaches to reporting on the novel coronavirus crisis using collaboration among journalists, newsrooms, and educational institutions across the globe.

We are also publishing “Speaking Out on Coronavirus”—stories and blogs by the Pulitzer Center team and our Campus Consortium partners reporting on the impact of coronavirus in their own backyards and around the world—from the frontlines in Seattle to school closings in Illinois, or cramped quarters in a refugee camp in Greece.

Help make our ongoing support for COVID-19 coverage possible—give today. See a summary of our response to the COVID 19 pandemic across our programs here.

 

COVID-19

Political Power and Chloroquine: A Long History

From the times of ancient Rome to the late 19th century, malaria was a deadly infection that no one knew how to cure, until chloroquine was discovered. Trump, Bolsonaro, and Maduro have defended its use against COVID-19, but scientific studies indicate that it is not effective.

Rebuilding the House of Miles

As two East St. Louis residents began to rebuild the House of Miles, they faced some questions over their motivations for renovating what was a dilapidated property with little sign of Davis — who lived there from 1939 to 1944. However, with a $250,000 capital improvement grant from the state of Illinois, they hope to welcome the public to an artistic hub once the threat of the coronavirus subsides.

It Took Me 16 Days to Walk From Colombia to Venezuela

Tens of thousands of Venezuelan migrants returned from Colombia to their native homes during the COVID-19 lockdown. Luis Guillermo Franquiz, a Venezuelan writer, was one of them. He lived and worked in Bogota. For 16 days, he walked to reach the border and crossed it. Luis Guillermo wrote his story.

Poverty and the Pandemic in Mississippi

The Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting captures the stories of people and places hit hardest by the nation’s worst pandemic in a century.