Country

Russia

No Refuge in Georgia

As the recent war between Russia and Georgia shows, the aftershocks of the collapse of the Soviet Union are still being felt today. 15 years ago, trouble started when two parts of Georgia, itself newly independent, tried to break away. War followed and entire communities were uprooted. Today over 200,000 refugees live in political limbo, unable to forget the place they once called home.

Aired the week of October 24 on Foreign Exchange.

Produced by Kira Kay, Jason Maloney and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Of Georgia, Jamtland and the Texas Solution

Thomas Goltz, special to the Pulitzer Center

Well, it seems to be over, surprise, surprise, unless it turns into WW III, which I hope it does not.

The Caucasus War of 8.8.8 that is, the two-week (or two day) hurly burly in the mountainous southwest corner of the defunct Soviet Union that was a national debacle for West-obsessed Georgia and a crushing victory for a resurgent Russia.

Abkhazia Pawns its Independence

They've been dreaming about independence for years. In 1999 Abkhazia's citizens voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence in a national referendum. When I met top Abkhaz politicians only few weeks ago, "independence" and "sovereign state" were terms they used frequently and longingly. For them, a return to Georgia was simply unacceptable. They called Russia their "window to the world". However, they also remembered periods during the Yeltsin years when their neighbour to the North did not always seem to be a reliable ally.

Georgia, Russia and a whiff of 1914

Pulitzer Center Staff

Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer spoke to the World Affairs Council of Houston Tuesday night (8/26), addressing the Caucasus conflict -- its roots, the media coverage of the Georgia/Russia war, and likely repercussions. He drew on his own reporting from Georgia and South Ossetia two years ago and on the current Pulitzer-funded reporting by Jason Maloney, Kira Kay and Zygmunt Dziesciolowski.

Abkhazia: Recognition at Last?

They've dreamed about it for years. In 1999, in a national referendum, Abkhazia's citizens voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence. When I met top Abkhaz politicians only few weeks ago, "independence" and "sovereign state" were terms they used frequently and longingly. For them, return to Georgia was simply unacceptable. They called Russia their "window to the world". However, they also remembered periods during the Yeltsin years when their neighbor to the North did not always seem to be a reliable ally.

Dzieciolowski's Russian radio reports

Zygmunt Dzieciolowski has been contributing to Russian radio stations on the Georgian conflict and its consequences. Videographer Jason Maloney, who is on the ground with Dzieciolowski, says that “this is extremely important from the perspective that he's really filling a void here, where there is really no other independent reporting available in the Russian language." Dzieciolowski spoke to the following stations:
 

The Creeping Caucasus Catastrophe

Russian troops and tanks may have at least partially completed their pull-out from territory seized during its August 8 blitz of this tiny post-Soviet country, but that should be little reason to celebrate, as the real (if creeping) catastrophe has just begun.

Abkhaz Citizens Strive to Shape Sovereign Nation

Special correspondent Kira Kay reports on the political tensions within Georgia's breakaway province Abkhazia. This report was produced in partnership with The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and The Bureau for International Reporting, and is a co-production with HDNet.

West Finds It Hard to Believe Russia's Version of the Conflict's Origin

Excerpt translated by Elena Kristalinski

US President George Bush considers Russia's actions towards Georgia "absolutely unacceptable". In Bush's opinion, Russia has to act decisively to put an end to the crisis, and repair the damage that was inflicted on Russia's relations with the neighboring countries, European Union and USA. Independent Polish journalist Zigmund Dzincholovsky, who happened to be in Tbilisi during the military standoff, compared how the events in the Caucasus were viewed by the different countries.

Inside Georgia as Russia Attacks

World Report is inside Georgia before and during the Russian onslaught, with exclusive access inside disputed territories. We look beyond the military story, at the roots of this conflict, America's involvement, and whether it might lead to a bigger, more dangerous fight.

Aired August 19, 2008

More information from HDNet.