Issue

Connected Coastlines

Connected Coastlines is a nationwide climate reporting initiative in U.S. coastal states. The initiative is building a consortium of newsrooms and independent journalists across America to report on the local effects of erratic weather patterns on coastal populations using the latest climate science. Currently, the Pulitzer Center is supporting 16 reporting projects and will cover climate change issues on every coastline in the mainland U.S.—the East Coast, Great Lakes, Gulf Coast and West Coast—along with Hawaii and Alaska. Please visit the special website we've created for the Connected Coastlines projects.

Connected Coastlines

Where Storms Are Lore, Folks See Change

While hurricanes are woven through the history of Down East Carteret County, a remote string of communities on the central North Carolina coast known for its fishing and boatbuilding traditions, Hurricane Florence was a turning point for conversations on "sea level rise".

Hawaii Watersheds

This project explores Hawaii’s unique island landscape and the crucial role watersheds play in mitigating climate change on Hawaii’s water resources, native species, and overall economy.

Cape Cod: At the Edge of a Warming World

Come with us as we explore Cape Cod to better understand what climate change is doing here, what it means for the future of this beloved place, and what the cost of inaction could be.

Living With Water

The Netherlands has long battled back the sea, but climate change is forcing the lowland nation to rethink its approach. It's now learning to live with water rather than fight it.

Mississippi Gulf Fisheries

After 15 years of one disaster after another, what does a changing climate mean for the survival of Mississippi's Gulf fisheries?

After the Ice

The Bering Sea's winter ice has helped to sustain a remarkable abundance of sea life. For the past two years, it's been gone, and scientists are scrambling to figure out what that means for the future.