Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Built To Last

A BuzzFeed News investigation based on thousands of satellite images reveals a vast, growing infrastructure for long-term detention and incarceration of Muslim minorities.

World War 501(c)(3)

With the war in Ukraine at a standstill, will crowd-funded military support break the deadlock?

Disclosure—Rwandan Children Born of Rape

Rwanda’s children born of genocide rape are coming of age—against the odds. Their mothers have now disclosed to their children the circumstances of how they were born.

The War Widows of Sri Lanka

It has been eight years since the end of Sri Lanka’s armed conflict, and Tamil-speaking war widows in the country's north are still seeking justice for wartime violations.

Scars and Resilience in South Sudan

In South Sudan, the trauma of the war and the use of child soldiers is transmitted from one generation to another. But people are also finding ways to keep hope.

Colombia: After the Peace Deal

After the deal, the hard work: an investigation looking at the successes and failures of Colombia’s peace agreement with the FARC guerrilla group.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson discusses his project, "The Healing," on the efforts of a Syrian-born pediatric neurologist to help refugees from Syria who are stuck in the Zaatari camp in Jordan.

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Taub

Journalist Ben Taub discusses his project, "The Assad Files," the story of how a group of war crimes investigators smuggled 600,000 pages of government documents out of Syria.

Syria's Children

This lesson introduces students to the Pulitzer Center e-book "Flight From Syria: Refugee Stories." Students examine and discuss the Syrian refugee crisis and its effect on children.

Libya After Liberation

Students will debate what policy Italy should implement when dealing with the migrants from Libya after their role in overthrowing Gaddafi.

Pulitzer Center Grantees Win 2019 Michael Kelly Award

Pulitzer Center grantees Maggie Michael, Nariman Ayman El-Mofty, and Maad al-Zikry were awarded the 2019 Michael Kelly Award for their Associated Press reporting on the cycles of epidemic, starvation and corruption faced by millions of civilians in Yemen's war.