Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Armenia Detains Several Opposition Leaders

An anti-government rally was broken up by police, who dragged away several of the leaders. Ruling party officials, meanwhile, are laying low since capitulating to Azerbaijan.

Race, Reunion, and Redemption

Judy Gladney and her late husband, Eric Vickers, were among the first African Americans to attend their suburban St. Louis high school. As her 50th class reunion approaches, Judy describes their struggle.

Will Afghanistan Find Peace?

As the United States negotiates its withdrawal from Afghanistan after 18 years of war, what is it leaving behind?

Lolas: Survivors of Enslavement

200,000 girls and women were sexually enslaved during World War II by the Japanese Imperial Army. Today, about 10 comfort women survive out of the estimated 1,000 Filipinas forced into servitude.

The Psyche of Syria's War Survivors

This project profiles the courageous journey of Syrian teenage social media icon Muhammad Najem and sheds light on the psychological picture of refugees who live or have family under regime bombings.

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.