Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Biden Still Wants to Close Guantánamo Prison

The Obama administration ran into a wall of political opposition when it tried to close Guantánamo Prison. The former vice president rarely brings up the topic and has yet to draw up a strategy but says he shares the goal.

Valley of Unrest

There are now nearly one million Indian troops stationed in Kashmir—more than at the height of the insurgency in the Nineties. The Muslim-majority region and its residents face a rising tide of Hindu nationalism.

Siona: Amazon’s Defenders Under Threat

Adiela, a Siona Indigenous leader, follows the spiritual guidance of her elders and clears landmines from her ancestral territory in the Colombian Amazon, in hope that her people may some day return.

Back From the Brink

Since leaving the service, Dustin Jones, USMC veteran and filmmaker, has lost more friends to suicide than he did in combat. Jones, a Columbia Journalism School Reporting Fellow, follows Marine veteran Bill Kirner as he struggles with PTSD and suicide.

Ukraine's War: Lives Frozen By Conflict

Paula Bronstein's focus is Ukraine's vulnerable, fragile elderly population trapped by an endless war that sees their lives frozen by conflict, impoverished, living in dilapidated homes.

Abandoned

This project explores the history of the Syrian Democratic Forces and the consequences of the American withdrawl from Syria.

Meet the Journalist: Amy Maxmen

The Democratic Republic of the Congo experienced the second largest Ebola outbreak in history. Journalist Amy Maxmen and photographer John Wessels report on challenges in the response.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation.