Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

The War Widows of Sri Lanka

It has been eight years since the end of Sri Lanka’s armed conflict, and Tamil-speaking war widows in the country's north are still seeking justice for wartime violations.

Scars and Resilience in South Sudan

In South Sudan, the trauma of the war and the use of child soldiers is transmitted from one generation to another. But people are also finding ways to keep hope.

Colombia: After the Peace Deal

After the deal, the hard work: an investigation looking at the successes and failures of Colombia’s peace agreement with the FARC guerrilla group.

The Good Friday Agreement 20 Years On: 'Women's Work'

Twenty years on from the Good Friday Agreement, women are once again holding Northern Irish society together through community and outreach programs, all while continuing to deal with lack of sufficient funding to prevent a backslide into the conflict and sectarianism of The Troubles.

The Ballymurphy Precedent

In The Ballymurphy Precedent, Collum Macrae probes the killings of 10 unarmed Catholics, including a priest and a mother of eight, in the West Belfast housing estate of Ballymurphy in August, 1971.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson discusses his project, "The Healing," on the efforts of a Syrian-born pediatric neurologist to help refugees from Syria who are stuck in the Zaatari camp in Jordan.

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Healing for Refugees from Syria

Analyze author’s purpose using articles and video exploring a community’s efforts to support Syrian refugees in Jordan.

Underrepresented Voices from Syria

This lesson plan asks students to explore three stories on underrepresented communities in Syria and think about how journalism can be used to bring attention to local underrepresented communities.

News Bite 1: Syria's Future

In this lesson, students will read and respond to a photograph and article excerpt by Lauren Gelfond Feldinger, published in the BBC Magazine, about Syrian refugee children in Jordan.