Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Crimean Camp for Young Communists Reopens With £160m Facelift

This summer, 45,000 children from 57 countries will visit the Artek centre near Yalta. For three weeks, they will live the lifestyle once considered the model for young communists, sleeping in dorms and eating meals in huge canteens while wearing color-coded uniforms.

When Will the Rohingya Refugees Return Home?

Refugees fear the fate that awaits them in Myanmar and are refusing to return without guarantees of safety. In the camps girls face being trafficked into the sex trade or forced into child marriages.

Obstacles to Balkans Peace

Russian meddling, nationalist rhetoric, and lingering hatred block Balkan conflict zones' progress.

What Grows in Bloody Ground

Caught between a rising China and a retreating United States, the Philippine government launches twin wars against the forces it says threaten to tear it apart: Chinese drug cartels and ISIS.

Rohingya Under Attack

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

An American War in the Sahara

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson discusses his project, "The Healing," on the efforts of a Syrian-born pediatric neurologist to help refugees from Syria who are stuck in the Zaatari camp in Jordan.

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Taub

Journalist Ben Taub discusses his project, "The Assad Files," the story of how a group of war crimes investigators smuggled 600,000 pages of government documents out of Syria.

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