Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

How Coronavirus Changed the Lebanese Revolution

In this episode of Almostajad, we meet Lebanese journalists John Qassir and Diana Muqalled. They discuss the impact of the coronavirus and lockdown on the revolution and how the Lebanese government used this time to create even stricter policies. We also listen to protestors who describe the changing trajectory of the uprising.

Introducing 'Back From the Brink'

After USMC veteran Bill Kirner's father dies, things go from bad to worse. In this trailer for Back From the Brink, Bill's wife worries about having guns in the house, fearing Bill may take his own life.

Lives Frozen by Conflict

Ukraine's war has displaced more than 1.5 million with over 10,000 civilian casualties. In 2014, when the violence broke out, many young people left, while the elderly stayed behind just barely surviving. 

Cafe Tekoa

What happens when a left-leaning Israeli filmmaker settles in a West-Bank settlement?

Redefining Gender Roles in Rwanda

Twenty-five years after the 1994 genocide, Rwanda has been labeled a champion for women's rights. What's changed? What work still needs to be done to ensure gender equality in a post-genocide era?

Still Surviving ISIS

Will the continued suffering of ISIS's victims result in a resurgence of the terror group?

Shallow Graves

ISIS has been destroyed, but will Iraq’s campaign of revenge help bring about its resurgence?

Judgment Day

This project takes readers inside a devastating air attack on civilians and critical infrastructure in a remote Yemeni village, while also tracking the weapons used in the attack as they make their way to Yemen from an American factory.

Meet the Journalist: Sarah A. Topol

What happens to children in Nigeria who were abducted by Boko Haram? Sarah Topol discusses the lives of those who have not escaped and are still controlled by the militant Islamist group.

Running for the Future of Congo

This lesson uses “What Makes the Kids of Congo Run” by Daniel Socha to introduce students to the situation in Eastern Congo, the challenges youth face, and ways to effect change.

The Power of Poetry

In this lesson, students investigate educational resources using diverse media in order to understand how poetry can be used as a means of communication.